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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 285 285 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 222 222 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 67 67 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 61 61 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 34 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 27 27 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 26 26 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 19 19 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 18 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for 1855 AD or search for 1855 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 3: Missouri, Louisiana, and California. 1850-1855. (search)
Chapter 3: Missouri, Louisiana, and California. 1850-1855. Having returned from California in January, 1850, with dispatches for the War Department, and having delivered them in person first to General Scott in New York City, and afterward to the Secretary of War (Crawford) in Washington City, I applied for and received a leave of absence for six months. I first visited my mother, then living at Mansfield, Ohio, and returned to Washington, where, on the 1st day of May, 1850, I was married to Miss Ellen Boyle Ewing, daughter of the Hon. Thomas Ewing, Secretary of the Interior. The marriage ceremony was attended by a large and distinguished company, embracing Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, T. H. Benton, President Taylor, and all his cabinet. This occurred at the house of Mr. Ewing, the same now owned and occupied by Mr. F. P. Blair, senior, on Pennsylvania Avenue, opposite the War Department. We made a wedding-tour to Baltimore, New York, Niagara, and Ohio, and returned to Washingt
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 4: California. 1855-1857. (search)
Chapter 4: California. 1855-1857. During the winter of 1854-55, I received frequent intimations in my letters from the St. Louis house, that the bank of Page, Bacon & Co. was in trouble, growing55, I received frequent intimations in my letters from the St. Louis house, that the bank of Page, Bacon & Co. was in trouble, growing out of their relations to the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad, to the contractors for building which they had made large advances, to secure which they had been compelled to take, as it were, an assignmes. Beyond all comparison, Page, Bacon & Co. were the most prominent bankers in California in 1853-55. Though I had notice of danger in that quarter, from our partners in St. Louis, nobody in Califortleman named Haskell had been in charge of Adams & Co. in San Francisco, but in the winter of 1854-55 some changes were made, and the banking department had been transferred to a magnificent office inourt, of which a Sydney man was reported to be the head or chief-justice. During the winter of 1855-56, and indeed throughout the year 1856, all kinds of business became unsettled in California. T
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 6: Louisiana. 1859-1861. (search)
t the tea-table, one evening, at the St. Louis Hotel. When Bragg was speaking of Beauregard's promotion, Mrs. Bragg, turning to me, said, You know that my husband is not a favorite with the new President. My mind was resting on Mr. Lincoln as the new President, and I said I did not know that Bragg had ever met Mr. Lincoln, when Mrs. Bragg said, quite pointedly, I didn't mean your President, but our President. I knew that Bragg hated Davis bitterly, and that he had resigned from the army in 1855, or 1856, because Davis, as Secretary of War, had ordered him, with his battery, from Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, to Fort Smith or Fort Washita, in the Indian country, as Bragg expressed it, to chase Indians with six-pounders. I visited the quartermaster, Colonel A. C. Myers, who had resigned from the army, January 28, 1861, and had accepted service under the new regime. His office was in the same old room in the Lafayette Square building, which he had in 1853, when I was there a commiss
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 8: from the battle of Bull Run to Paducah--Kentucky and Missouri. 1861-1862. (search)
ant came, to whom I addressed the same inquiry. He in turn did not know, and I bade him find out, ap I had immediate and important business with the general. The sergeant entered the house by the front-basement door, and after ten or fifteen minutes the main front-door above was slowly opened from the inside, and who should appear but my old San Francisco acquaintance Isaiah C. Woods, whom I had not seen or heard of since his flight to Australia, at the time of the failure of Adams & Co. in 1855! He ushered me in hastily, closed the door, and conducted me into the office on the right of the hall. We were glad to meet, after so long and eventful an interval, and mutually inquired after our respective families and special acquaintances. I found that he was a commissioned officer, a major on duty with Fremont, and Major Eaton, now of the Paymaster's Department, was in the same office with him. I explained to them that I had come from General Anderson, and wanted to confer with Genera