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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for Mary Lynch or search for Mary Lynch in all documents.

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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 3: Missouri, Louisiana, and California. 1850-1855. (search)
ed for San Juan del Norte, with the family, composed of Mrs. Sherman, Lizzie, then less than a year old, and her nurse, Mary Lynch. Our passage down was uneventful, and, on the boats up the Nicaragua River, pretty much the same as before. On reachi and as usual the trip partook of the ludicrous--Mrs. Sherman mounted on a donkey about as large as a Newfoundland dog; Mary Lynch on another, trying to carry Lizzie on a pillow before her, but her mule had a fashion of lying down, which scared her, d a native boat, which had to be kept outside the surf. Mrs. Sherman was first taken in the arms of two stout natives; Mary Lynch, carrying Lizzie, was carried by two others; and I followed, mounted on the back of a strapping fellow, while fifty or a hundred others were running to and fro, cackling like geese. Mary Lynch got scared at the surf, and began screaming like a fool, when Lizzie became convulsed with fear, and one of the natives rushed to her, caught her out of Mary's arms, and car
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 23 (search)
ondage and placing us where we can reap the fruit of our own labor, and take care of ourselves and assist the Government in maintaining our freedom. . . . . . . . . . Fourth Question. State in what manner you would rather live — whether scattered among the whites, or in colonies by yourselves? Answer. I would prefer to live by ourselves, for there is a prejudice against us in the South that will take years to get over; but I do not know that I can answer for my brethren. (All but Mr. Lynch, a missionary from the North, agreed with Frazier, but he thought they ought to live together, along with the whites.) . . . . . . . . . Eighth Question. If the rebel leaders were to arm the slaves, what would be its effect? Answer. I think they would fight as long as they were before the bayonet, and just as soon as they could get away they would desert, in my opinion. . . . . . . . . . Tenth Question. Do you understand the mode of enlistment of colored persons in the rebel Sta