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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 190 22 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 93 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 42 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 38 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 33 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 9 1 Browse Search
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 8 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) or search for Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
om Goldsboroa in wagons as fast as possible, found plenty of willing ears, though my army of eighty thousand men had been at Goldsboroa from March 22d to the date of his dispatch, April 26th; and such a train would have been composed of from fifteen to thirty-two six-mule teams to have hauled this specie, even if it all were in gold. I suppose the exact amount of treasure which Davis had with him is now known to a cent; some of it was paid to his escort, when it disbanded at and near Washington, Georgia, and at the time of his capture he had a small parcel of gold and silver coin, not to exceed ten thousand dollars, which is now retained in the United States Treasury.vault at Washington, and shown to the curious. The thirteen millions of treasure, with which Jeff. Davis was to corrupt our armies and buy his escape, dwindled down to the contents of a hand-valise! To say that I was merely angry at the tone and substance of these published bulletins of the War Department, would ha