hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 66 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 48 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 42 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 36 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 30 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 16 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 16 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Bayard Taylor or search for Bayard Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 5 document sections:

altimore!” V. We had no arms; as friends we came, As brothers evermore, To rally round one sacred name, The charter of our power and fame: We never dreamed of guilt and shame In Baltimore. VI. The coward mob upon us fell: McHenry's flag they tore: Surprised, borne backward by the swell, Beat down with mad, inhuman yell, Before us yawned a traitorous hell In Baltimore? VII. The streets our soldier-fathers trod Blushed with their children's gore; We saw the craven rulers nod, And dip in blood the civic rod-- Shall such things be, O righteous God, In Baltimore? VIII. No, never! By that outrage black, A solemn oath we swore, To bring the Keystone's thousands back, Strike down the dastards who attack, And leave a red and fiery track Through Baltimore! IX. Bow down, in haste, thy guilty head! God's wrath is swift and sore: The sky with gathering bolts is red-- Cleanse from thy skirts the slaughter shed, Or make thyself an ashen bed-- Oh Baltimore! Bayard Taylor, in the N. Y. Tribun
g Post tells the following anecdote:--Three months ago I was returning from Washington, when Colonel Taylor, (brother of the late President Taylor,) who is now in the federal army, being on a visit toPresident Taylor,) who is now in the federal army, being on a visit to Newark, N. J., joined our party. Colonel Jeff. Davis, as is well known, ran away with General Taylor's daughter, and the families were intimate. Colonel Taylor had but a short time before held an aGeneral Taylor's daughter, and the families were intimate. Colonel Taylor had but a short time before held an after-dinner's conversation with Jefferson Davis, and while lamenting the approaching troubles, gave us an account of that conversation. The words of Colonel Taylor were nearly as follows: AfterColonel Taylor had but a short time before held an after-dinner's conversation with Jefferson Davis, and while lamenting the approaching troubles, gave us an account of that conversation. The words of Colonel Taylor were nearly as follows: After a free talk about our country's troubles, we sat still smoking for some time, when I said, Colonel, what a bad way we are in. Oh! yes, yes, replied Davis, with comparative indifference. Thinking toColonel Taylor were nearly as follows: After a free talk about our country's troubles, we sat still smoking for some time, when I said, Colonel, what a bad way we are in. Oh! yes, yes, replied Davis, with comparative indifference. Thinking to touch his pride a little, I said, Colonel, what a fine chance for a southern man to distinguish himself by uniting the North and South! We shall see, we shall see, was Davis's answer, and he went o
76. to the American people. by Bayard Taylor. I. That late, in half-despair, I said: “The Nation's ancient life is dead; Her arm is weak, her blood is cold; She hugs the peace that gives her gold-- The shameful peace, that sees expire Each beacon-light of patriot fire, And makes her court a traitor's den” -- Forgive me this, my Countrymen! II. Oh, in your long forbearance grand, Slow to suspect the treason planned, Enduring wrong, yet hoping good For sake of olden brotherhood, How grander, how sublimer far, At the roused Eagle's call ye are, Leaping from slumber to the fight For Freedom and for Chartered Right! III. Throughout the land there goes a cry: A sudden splendor fills the sky; From every hill the banners burst, Like buds by April breezes nurst; In every hamlet, home, and mart, The fire-beat of a single heart Keeps time to strains whose pulses mix Our blood with that of Seventy-Six! IV. The shot whereby the old flag fell From Sumter's battered citadel, Struck down the
e arrangements to quarter our soldiers. My own regiment is already unanimously determined to occupy A. T. Stewart's dry goods house. However, arrangements equally as good have been made for the balance of the regiments. I shall take my grub at Taylor's with the general officers, but be certain to have ample arrangements. Tell Delmonico to be ready for us also. Be kind enough to meet me, and invite all the members of the following houses * * * * and my particular friend----at Taylor's. Be cegood have been made for the balance of the regiments. I shall take my grub at Taylor's with the general officers, but be certain to have ample arrangements. Tell Delmonico to be ready for us also. Be kind enough to meet me, and invite all the members of the following houses * * * * and my particular friend----at Taylor's. Be certain to make ample arrangements. My appetite is very good, and the camp life is said to make soldiers eat hearty. J. W. Proudfit. --N. Y. Evening Post, May 15.
121. Scott and the veteran. by Bayard Taylor. I. An old and crippled veteran to the War Department came; He sought the Chief who led him on many a field of fame-- The Chief who shouted “Forward!” where'er his banner rose, And bore its stars in triumph behind the flying foes. II. “Have you forgotten, General,” the battered soldier cried, “The days of Eighteen Hundred Twelve, when I was at your side? Have you forgotten Johnson, that fought at Lundy's Lane? 'Tis true, I'm old and pensioned, but I want to fight again.” III. “Have I forgotten?” said the Chief; “my brave old soldier, No! And here's the hand I gave you then, and let it tell you so; But you have done your share, my friend; you're crippled, old, and gray, And we have need of younger arms and fresher blood to-day.” IV. “But, General,” cried the veteran, a flush upon his brow, ”The very men who fought with us, they say, are traitors now; They've torn the flag of Lundy's Lane — our old red, white, an