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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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ch appeared on the back of my hand, which I seem to see now. What is that? said I, alarmed, I know not why, at the blotch on my hand. That, said he, dropping my hand, is the mark by which Benedict Arnold is known in the next world. He said no more, gentlemen, but drew from beneath his cloak an object which he laid upon the table — laid upon the very paper on which I was writing. This object, gentlemen, was a skeleton. There, said he, there are the bones of Isaac Hayne, who was hung at Charleston by the British. He gave his life in order to establish the Union. When you put your name to a Declaration of Dissolution, why, you may as well have the bones of Isaac Hayne before you — he was a South Carolinian and so are you. But there was no blotch on his right hand. With these words the intruder left the room. I started back from the contact with the dead man's bones and — awoke. Overcome by labor, I had fallen asleep, and had been dreaming. Was it not a singular dream? All the <
Dec. 27.--A correspondent in Charleston says, Fight crops out everywhere, especially in the speech of youthful South Carolina; like New York Mose, he is literally spiling for lack of one. You might deservedly apostrophize him as John Willett did his son, With his hat cocked, with a fire-eating, bilina water-drinking, swaggeriuting for the last-named person the name of our sorely-tried parent, Uncle Sam. For information, I take up to-day's Courier, the oldest and most respectable of Charleston dailies, at random. I find in it a communication, over the expressive signature of Rifle, suggesting that one of the crack regiments of the North should charter a couple of steamboats and come on to Charleston, to the rescue of the forts; that the first shedding of fraternal blood may be precipitated in a manner congenial to the aspirations of youthful South Carolina! The same paper chronicles an application for five hundred of Colt's pistols, received from Alabama, under the title of
Dec. 29.--On Christmas Day Major Anderson dined formally with the secession authorities-chiefs — in Charleston, and was duly carried back to Fort Moultrie by early moonlight, apparently very much overcome by the good things drinkable set before him. Those in charge of the steamer posted in the channel to watch his movements in the fort therefore thought it would be safe for them to relax their vigilance, and themselves take a Christmas night frolic, and in the midst of which Anderson and his force spiked Moultrie's guns and landed safely in Fort Sumter. The apparent intoxication of Anderson was but a feint to have the very effect it did have.--Washington Star, Dec. 29.
Washington, Dec. 20.--Orders have been issued to Major Anderson to surrender Fort Moultrie if attacked. Major Anderson telegraphs here that he had surrendered a large number of arms which had been removed from the arsenal to Fort Moultrie, to the authorities of Charleston, on a demand being made for them. This was done in obedience, as he says, to the spirit of orders he had received from Washington. The South Carolina ordinance of secession was received this afternoon by President Buchanan. A number of Southern men were with him at the time. He exhibited much agitation on hearing the news. The news of the passage of the ordinance produced intense excitement in Congress. The South Carolina members were congratulated by the Southern men.--N. Y. Times, Dec. 20.
Dec. 22.--It is reported in Charleston, to day, that Major Anderson has been ordered to surrender the forts to the constituted authorities of South Carolina, in case the forts are attacked; but not to surrender to irresponsible parties.
horities attach the same. If a single State goes out of the Union, Mr. Schell regards it as broken up, and says, Lincoln is not President; and neither he nor any of the federal officials will resign or surrender their power and the public money to any except to the city treasury. Mr. John J. Cisco, the Subtreasurer, takes the same view. He has several millions at his disposal. A large portion is in bars of gold, valued at $1,000 each. These are being painted white, so as not to attract attention in case of being removed from the sub-treasury vaults in case of a riot or of Lincoln claiming to be the President.--N. Y. Correspondent of Mobile Register. it is asserted in Charleston, that President Buchanan had pledged his honor to South Carolinians that the forts should not be reinforced, that they should be given up to the State authorities when demanded, and also that General Cass's resignation originated in his condemning this promise of treason.--Cor. Evening Post, Dec. 31.
tterest of Anti-Republicans, does not hesitate to assure Southern men that the Free States are forgetting all political parties and uniting as one man for the Union. Talking with a South Carolina Commissioner, the latter is reported to have told him that if Massachusetts should send 10,000 men to preserve the Union against Southern secession, she would have to fight twice the number of her own citizens at home, who would oppose the policy. By no means, Mr. Butler replied; when we come from Massachusetts we will leave not a single traitor behind, unless he is hanging upon a tree. Private accounts from Charleston state that a thousand negroes are engaged in the erection of fortifications in the harbor, and that the channels leading to Fort Sumter have been obstructed by sunken vessels, and the buoys removed. Also that Governor Pickens has received the offer of 10,000 volunteers from without the State, who hold themselves in readiness to march at a minute's warning. --Times, Jan. 3.
Jan. 5.--The Southern senators at Washington say, that the United States frigate Brooklyn, if sent to Charleston, will be sunk in the harbor; that the light-houses will be darkened, the buoys removed, and the battery opened upon the steamer from Morris Island.--Boston Transcript, Jan. 6.
Jan. 7.--A gentleman from Charleston says that every thing there betokens active preparations for fight. Last Sunday, he says, not a lady was at the church he attended. They were all at home making cartridges and cylinders, and scraping lint. The thousand negroes busy in building batteries, so far from inclining to insurrection, were grinning from ear to ear at the prospect of shooting the Yankees. Extravagant reports were current as to the hostile designs of the Federal Government, such as that the Macedonian was on her way with five hundred troops.--Evening Post, Jan. 7.
of all the troops in garrison.--N. Y. Times, Jan. 8. Jan. 9.--Reports of the suffering at Charleston continue. A dispatch from Washington confirms the previous accounts. It says; A gentleman arrived this evening from Charleston, in company with Corn. Shubrick. Both say the panic which prevails there is unparalleled. There is a great lack of food, business is prostrated; the people are paragraph: We learn, through a private letter, from a perfectly responsible. source in Charleston, that the other day a body of twenty minute-men from the country entered a large private housenner was given them, and then they demanded ten dollars each, saying that they had not come to Charleston for nothing; and the money was furnished also. Another fact of still greater significance has, a native of South Carolina, who is loyal to the stars and stripes, requesting him to come to Charleston and protect them from the mob. The officer has declined, saying that he can serve his country
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