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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 298 44 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 252 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 126 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 90 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 69 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 35 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 29 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Warren or search for Warren in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

humbled!--when it flew Above the band that fought so well, And not, till hope's last ray withdrew, Before the traitors' cannon fell! No, Anderson! with loud acclaim We hail thee hero of the hour When circling batteries poured their flame Against thy solitary tower. Stood Lacedaemon then less proud, When her three hundred heroes, slain, No road but o'er their breasts allowed To Xerxes and his servile train? Or does New England blush to show Yon hill, though victory crowned it not-- Though Warren fell before the foe, And Putnam left the bloody spot? The voices of earth's noblest fields With the deep voice within unite-- 'Tis not success true honor yields, But faithful courage for the right. Keep, then proud foe, the crumbled tower, From those brave few by thousands torn, But keep in silence, lest the hour Should come for vengeance on your scorn. Yet I could weep; for where ye stand, In friendly converse have I stood, And clasped, perchance, full many a hand, Now armed to shed a br
22. the Massachusetts regiments. by Almira Seymour. They were reared on the soil whence the Adamses sprung, That to Hancock and Warren gave birth; Descendants of sires whose proud names have been sung In the noblest hosannas of earth. They were trained in our shops, they were trained in our schools, They've been taught on our free waves to sail They have learned of Progression the practice and rules, But they know not the meaning of fail. They marched 'neath that Banner whose glorious light Has been the world's Hope-star in heaven; They march in defence of the True and the Right, And God's power to each strong arm is given. That flag will still wave o'er the Land of the Free, Though Treason by millions assail; The sons of the Bay State have sworn it shall be, And they know not the meaning of fail. Go, join them, brave brothers I still rallying, go! Wives and sisters are calling the rolls-- On their cheeks fall sad tears, but they're quenched in the glow That rays out from their
31. the United States flag--1861. inscribed to S. P. Russell, Esq. by William Ross Wallace. ´╝łAs read by John Keynton, Esq., at the great Union Meeting at Yorkville, N. Y. Flag of the valiant and the tried, Where Marion fought and Warren died! Flag of the mountain and the lake! Of rivers rolling to the sea In that broad grandeur fit to make The symbols of Eternity 1 O fairest Flag! O dearest Land! Who shall your banded children sever? God of our fathers! here we stand, A true, a free, a fearless band, Heart pressed to heart, hand linked in hand, And swear that Flag shall float forever! Still glorious Banner of the Free! The nations turn with hope to thee: And when thy mighty shadow falls Along the armory's trophied walls, The ancient trumpets long for breath; The dinted sabres fiercely start To vengeance from each clanging sheath, As if they sought some traitor's heart O sacred Banner of the Brave! O standard of ten thousand ships! O guardian of Mount Vernon's grave! Come,
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Pro Patria: inscribed to the Second New Hampshire Regiment. (search)
ail to the stars that are set in their banner! All hail to the red, and the white, and the blue! As each column wheels by, Hear their hearts' battle-cry,-- It was Warren's,--'Tis sweet for our country to die! II. Lancaster and Coos, Laconia and Concord, Old Portsmouth and Keene, send their stalwart young men; They come from the plough, and the loom, and the anvil, From the marge of the sea, from the hill-top and glen. As each column wheels by, Hear their hearts' battle-cry,-- It was Warren's,--'Tis sweet for our country to die! III. The prayers of fair women, like legions of angels, Watch over our soldiers by day and by night; And the King of all Glory, tyers of fair women, like legions of angels, Watch over our soldiers by day and by night; And the King of all Glory, the Chief of all Armies, Shall love them and lead them who dare to be right! As each column wheels by, Hear their hearts' battle-cry,-- It was Warren's,--'Tis sweet for our country to die! --N. Y. Tribune, June 21.