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Doc. 24.-interview with loyal Indians. Leavenworth, Kansas, February 2. The importance of the interview between Commissioner Dole and the Chiefs of the Seminoles, Creeks, Iowas, and Delawares, loyal Indians, at the Planters' House yesterday, can hardly be over-estimated. There were present Col. Wm. G. Coffin, SuperintenIndians, at the Planters' House yesterday, can hardly be over-estimated. There were present Col. Wm. G. Coffin, Superintendent of the Southern Indians; Major G. A. Cutler, Agent of the Creeks; Major W. F. M. Arny, Agent of Indians in New-Mexico ; Major Snow, Agent of the Seminoles ; Major Fielding Johnson, agent of the Delawares; and Major Robert Burbank, Agent of the Iowas. The Indians expressed great pleasure in seeing Commissioner Dole. The Sou to put down this rebellion, in case it is your pleasure to give your services. You will not be expected to fight white men unless they are arrayed against loyal Indians. You will receive the same pay as white men. The Government has not horses. The red man is said to be fleet on foot, and it seems to me that you ought to be abl
e Twenty-second Indiana, during all this time, engaged a large force of the Arkansas troops and Indians, and, after a sharp engagement, put them to flight. In the mean time, the Second brigade renewee times our number, of the best Louisiana and Arkansas troops, assisted by a large body of Cherokee Indians, many of whom paid the penalty of their base ingratitude to the Government that has so bounrce, consisting of the Third Louisiana, two regiments of Arkansas troops, and a regiment of Cherokee Indians, immediately turned upon us, and made a vigorous attack, but having ordered my men to lie dSugar Creek. A small force was left to make a feint upon our front, and a considerable body of Indians, under Gen. Albert Pike, took position about two miles on our right to divert attention from thn of volleys of musketry, followed by a bayonet-charge, covered the ground with dead Texans and Indians, and brought back the guns lost but a few moments before. Gen. Sigel then came forward with th
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 151.-the fight at Neosho, Mo. (search)
ran them off in the timber, and we could not get at them. We took twelve of their men prisoners that day, making in all about fifty. The Major told a captain's wife that if they hurt Dock or his fellow-prisoner, he would hang every one of their men he had or could get. We started back for camp about one o'clock, and got there about five o'clock in the evening. On arriving we found we were surrounded on three sides by about two thousand men, including Colonel Stainwright's regiment of Indians. We staid in camp all night, sleeping on our arms, but they did nothing but fire on our pickets three or four times during the night, just enough to keep us from sleeping. They wounded one of our pickets, shooting him through the leg just below the knee, but not breaking the bone. We started for Cassville the next morning, having been gone four days, but we found it a very serious undertaking, for we had to fight our way through. It was one continual roar of guns from the time we starte