hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 73 7 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 70 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 67 1 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 56 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 26 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 25 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 1 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 20 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 18 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 15 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Thomas Williams or search for Thomas Williams in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 2 document sections:

mp Wool. A battery is in course of construction near the camps, which is nearly ready to receive its armament. Brig.-Gen. Williams is in command of this post. January 15. The prospect for a better day is promising this morning. The wind, whwashed ashore by the tide, this afternoon. A consultation was held to-day by Gens. Burnside, Foster, Reno, Parke, and Williams, the result of which is preparation for an advance, probably toward Roanoke Island, on which the rebels are known to be ty-eighth Pennsylvania volunteers, under the command of Capt. James Wren. The post is under the command of Brigadier-Gen. Thomas Williams, with the following staff: Assistant Adjutant-General, Lieutenant C. Cook; Brigade Quartermaster, Lieut. H. Evania will not be relieved, as was stated in a previous letter, but will continue to form a portion of the command of Gen. Williams. Hatteras Inlet, January 20. The chief object of interest at present, is the difficulty in getting vessels over t
ll anchor for the night. The entire distance from Hatteras Inlet to Roanoke Island is laid down at about thirty-eight miles. The Eighty-ninth New-York, the Sixth New-Hampshire, and the Eighth and Eleventh Connecticut have been assigned to Gen. Williams's brigade, and remain at Hatteras Inlet, in camp. This force will take part in some future movements in this department. About fifty vessels are left behind at the Inlet. They consist of schooners, chiefly loaded with stores of various dation of the landing. Lieut. Andrews is a son of Mr. Stephen P. Andrews, of New-York, and is topographical officer on Gen. Burnside's staff. He is a lieutenant in Colonel Hawkins's Zouave regiment, and has acted as topographical engineer on Gen. Williams's staff. He has made soundings of many localities here, and several reconnoissances. After sounding the water, he went ashore, and looking about a short time became convinced that some guns were stationed so as to command the landing, and t