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i. On one Sabbath he had his church ornamented with U. S. flags and brass eagles; his hymns were the Star-Spangled Banner, the Red, White, and Blue, and Hail Columbia. He prayed that the Union may be preserved, even though blood may come out of the wine-press even unto the horses' bridles, by the space of a thousand and six hundred furlongs. In the course of his sermon he said: I trust our troops will rally and wipe out the disgrace of Manassas, though it cost the life of every rebel under arms. Let Davis and Beauregard be captured to meet the fate of Haman. Hang them up on Mason and Dixon's Line, that traitors of both sections may be warned. Let them hang until the vultures shall eat their rotten flesh from their bones; let them hang until the crows shall build their filthy nests in their skeletons; let them hang until the rope rots, and let their dismembered bones fall so deep into the earth that God Almighty can't find them in the day of resurrection. --Mobile Tribune.
How it was found out.--A Richmond correspondent of the New-Orleans Crescent relates the following singular story: As for Columbus, I repeat my confidence in the genius of Beauregard. If the place can be held by human pluck and skill, he will hold it. To show his military intuition, I will tell you a fact which came to me lately from the chief of his staff. Do you remember a story in the Yankee papers about an interview between McClellan, Lincoln, and a third person, whose name was not gough, poor Thomas was as innocent of treason as an unborn babe. When the Yankee advances upon Munson's Hill began, rockets were thrown up by the various divisions to notify each other that they were in motion. Of course this was at night. Gen. Beauregard, seeing the rockets, suspected something was in the wind. He, therefore, caused his Chief of Ordnance, Col. Alexander, to be waked up, and told him that while he was entirely ignorant of the meaning of these rockets, he was satisfied that w
n is the President, He'll wish his days in Springfield spent; Fight away, etc. We'll show him that Old Scott's a fool, We'll never submit to Yankee rule! Fight away, etc. At first our States were only seven, But now we number stars eleven; Fight away, etc. Brave old Missouri shall be ours, Despite old Lincoln's Northern powers I Fight away, etc. We have no ships, we have no navies, But mighty faith in the great Jeff. Davis; Fight away, etc. Due honor too we will award, To gallant Bragg and Beauregard! Fight away, etc. Abe's proclamation in a twinkle, Stirred up the blood of Rip Van Winkle; Fight away, etc. Jeff Davis' answer was short and curt “Fort Sumter's taken, and nobody's hurt! ” Fight away, etc. We hear the words of this same ditty, To the right and left of the Mississippi; Fight away, etc. In the land of flowers hot and sandy, From Delaware Bay to the Rio Grande! Fight away, etc. The ladies cheer with heart and hand, The men who fight for Dixie's land; Fight away, etc. The “St<
could not save them, All their boasting was in vain, Before the Southern steel they cowered, And their bodies strewed the plain. So let the Yankees, etc. The “Maryland Line” was there as ever, With their battle-shout and blade, They shed new lustre on their mother, When that final charge they made. So let the Yankees, etc. Old Abe may make another effort, For to take his onward way, But his legions then as ever, Will be forced to run away. So let the Yankees, etc. Brave Jeff. and glorious Beauregard, With dashing Johnston, noble, true, Will meet their hireling hosts again, And scatter them like morning dew. So let the Yankees, etc. When the Hessian horde is driven, O'er Potomac's classic flood, The pulses of a new-born freedom, Then will stir old Maryland's blood. So let the Yankees, etc. From the lofty Alleghanies, To old Worcester's sea-washed shore, Her sons will come to greet the victors, There in good old Baltimore. So let the Yankees, etc. Then with voices light and gladsome, We
Story of Beauregard's Sickness.--A despatch says that the story of Beauregard's being sick is false. We know that it was true. We had a long and interesting interview, with a perfectly reliable Beauregard's being sick is false. We know that it was true. We had a long and interesting interview, with a perfectly reliable Pittsburgher, who was in Columbus, Kentucky, on last Tuesday week, after the battle of Donelson, and Beauregard was there. This gentleman knows and conversed there with Generals Polk, Cheatham, and BBeauregard was there. This gentleman knows and conversed there with Generals Polk, Cheatham, and Beauregard's staff-officers, and says that Beauregard had been quite sick, but not dangerously so — nothing worse than a very severe cold, which had quite enfeebled him. After his arrival, he mounted aBeauregard's staff-officers, and says that Beauregard had been quite sick, but not dangerously so — nothing worse than a very severe cold, which had quite enfeebled him. After his arrival, he mounted a horse and rode around for two hours, carefully surveying the natural and artificial defences of the place, and his report was, in short: You must evacuate. You have a wonderful amount of guns here, Beauregard had been quite sick, but not dangerously so — nothing worse than a very severe cold, which had quite enfeebled him. After his arrival, he mounted a horse and rode around for two hours, carefully surveying the natural and artificial defences of the place, and his report was, in short: You must evacuate. You have a wonderful amount of guns here, but no casemates. You couldn't hold the place two hours, and as for that trap down yonder, pointing to the water-battery placed on a level with the Mississippi and its posterior flat, it is a perfect<
. Come, all ye sons of freedom, and join our Southern band; We're going to fight the enemy, and drive them from our land. Justice is our motto, Providence our guide, So jump in the wagon, and we'll all take a ride. Chorus. Oh I wait for the wagon, The dissolution; The South is our wagon, And we'll all take a ride. Secession is our watchword, our rights we all demand, And to defend our firesides we pledge our hearts and hand. Jeff Davis is our President, with Stephens by his side; Brave Beauregard, our general, will join us in the ride. Our wagon is plenty big enough, the running-gear is good ; It's stuffed around with cotton, and made of Southern wood, Carolina is our driver, with Georgia by her side, Virginia will hold her flag up, and we'll all take a ride. There are Tennessee and Texas also in the ring; They wouldn't have a government where cotton wasn't king. Alabama and Florida have long ago replied; Mississippi and Louisiana are anxious for the ride. Missouri, North-Carolin
.--If you will join the Dixie band, etc. These hirelings they'll never stand, These hirelings they'll never stand, These hirelings they'll never stand, Whenever they see the Southern band. Chorus.--If you will join the Dixie band, etc. Old Abe has got into a trap, Old Abe has got into a trap, Old Abe has got into a trap, And he can't get out with his Scotch cap. Chorus.--If you will join the Dixie band, etc. Nobody's hurt is easy spun, Nobody's hurt is easy spun, Nobody's hurt is easy spun, But the Yankees caught it at Bull Run. Chorus.--If you will join the Dixie band, etc. We rally to Jeff. Davis true, Beauregard and Johnston too; Magruder, Price, and General Bragg, And give three cheers for the Southern flag. Chorus.--If you will join the Dixie band, etc. We'll drink this toast to one and all, Keep cocked and primed for the Southern call; The day will come, we'll make the stand, Then we'll be free in Maryland. Chorus.--If you will join the Dixie band, etc January 30, 1862.
d never be finer; One glance at your bowie-knives' savage expression Should frighten to death every cowardly Hessian-- There's some dittle lifference 'twixt you and me; What is it? Be patient — you'll very soon see. Bang goes the big cannon — crack go the sure rifles-- On, on moves the North, for it don't stop at trifles; The battle is ended; who's winner? I am, Says our liberty-loving, thrice blest Uncle Sam! On your Western Gibraltars while placing reliance, With cotton-zone heroes and Beauregard's science, Our banner-defenders, amid battle's din, Marched up to your works, then bravely dashed in. Your rebels discuss, with such evident unction, Our only defeat at Manassas' famed Junction, Let me ask you one question, with a very low bow, You held it at that time, but who holds it now? Why, what were you doing, O fierce Texan Ranger! Who sleep on volcanoes and breakfast on danger, On the day when the chivalry, panic-struck, ran, Basely frightened away by our wee Iron mand Banks, “<