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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,016 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 573 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 458 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 394 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 392 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 384 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 304 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 258 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 256 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 244 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) or search for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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rs, swift and strong, From nightmare dreams that kissed them down so long; One with a myriad hearts and myriad feet, From field and fireside, lane and thronged street! The battle-fires were leaping up as one, When Baltimore reechoed Lexington! --Kentucky! though unnerved thy mighty hand, Till in thy breast had warmed the traitor band, Thank God! the serpent nursed and nourished there, Timely thrust forth to bite the winter air, Poisons no more where it would fain have fed, And hisses harmless Buckner's shame; Crittenden speaks, and Rousseau's sword's aflame; (And, Prentice!--blame your newsboy!--by the Eternal, You take the War Department of — the Journal!) Lo! where they stand, the impious-hearted ones, Who dare to call themselves Kentucky's sons! No! the old Mother knows them not; she knows Her household shame, her fireside's fiercest foes. Her curse is on them — lo! the Mother saith, “Scatter my chaff before the cannon's breath!” --Therefore, O Year, within thy coffin lie, W
ry Along the coasts, the Middle States replied From thronging marts, the echoes leaped along The Mississippi Valley, whose vast floods Throb like the pulses of the Nation's heart, And pale Virginia, all besprinkled now With War's red baptism, to Kentucky spoke, Kentucky tried but faithful unto death To sad Missouri called, Missouri passed The kindling watchword to the vast North-west, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Who louder sang than Niagara's roar To the unconquered heights of Tennessee; Hoarse echKentucky tried but faithful unto death To sad Missouri called, Missouri passed The kindling watchword to the vast North-west, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Who louder sang than Niagara's roar To the unconquered heights of Tennessee; Hoarse echoes, like the low sepulchral moan Of subterranean fires, disturbed the Gulf-- The bleeding Gulf betrayed and overawed-- Then swelling loud as an Archangel's trump, Or shrill winds piping o'er the stormy flood, It thundered back from far Pacific's coast. Come to the tombs by mourning millions thronged Beneath the oak of weeping. Glorious dead Fame's cemetery holds no hero dust More dearly honored in sublime repose. Pale ashes, with a nation's tears bedewed, And fanned by sighs as numerous as th
e came from Wheeling, where, after having been confined for some time in the prison there, she made her escape by tying the sheets together and letting herself down from the prison window. She has been in communication with the rebel leaders in Kentucky, advising them to make certain changes in their plan of operations. When arrested the second time, within ten miles of the enemy's lines in Kentucky, $7500 of unexpended money, furnished by the rebels, was found upon her person. She has been aKentucky, $7500 of unexpended money, furnished by the rebels, was found upon her person. She has been a correspondent of the Richmond Enquirer and the Baltimore Exchange. Miss Poole is yet in confinement in the Sixteenth-Street Jail. Among the number yet confined here is Mrs. Baxley, formerly a resident of Baltimore. She was arrested on the 23d of December. She had just come from Richmond, and had been in conversation with Jeff. Davis, from whom she had obtained a commission in the rebel army for her lover, Dr. Brown. She is, as she represents herself, a very explosive woman, and it was fro
The Rev. H. A. M. Henderson, of Alabama, who has been passing some time in Kentucky, writes a letter to the New-Orleans Christian Advocate, from which the following is extracted: To give you the animus of the Northern Methodist Church in Kentucky, allow me to tell your readers about one Rev. (?) Mr. Black, stationed in Newport, opposite Cincinnati. On one Sabbath he had his church ornamented with U. S. flags and brass eagles; his hymns were the Star-Spangled Banner, the Red, White, aKentucky, allow me to tell your readers about one Rev. (?) Mr. Black, stationed in Newport, opposite Cincinnati. On one Sabbath he had his church ornamented with U. S. flags and brass eagles; his hymns were the Star-Spangled Banner, the Red, White, and Blue, and Hail Columbia. He prayed that the Union may be preserved, even though blood may come out of the wine-press even unto the horses' bridles, by the space of a thousand and six hundred furlongs. In the course of his sermon he said: I trust our troops will rally and wipe out the disgrace of Manassas, though it cost the life of every rebel under arms. Let Davis and Beauregard be captured to meet the fate of Haman. Hang them up on Mason and Dixon's Line, that traitors of both section
pon it, was the heroic injunction of a Spartan mother. Sound the trumpet, sound! The die is cast, The rubicon of fate is passed, The loyal and the rebel hosts, Kentucky, throng thy leaguered coasts, And on the issue of the strife Hang peace and liberty and life; All that the storied past endears, And all the hopes of coming year glory, Still pressing where the starry light Streamed like a meteor o'er the fight, Till their expiring bosoms poured The red libation of the sword, Would leave Kentucky now, or thrust Her beaming forehead in the dust, Where treason's reptiles writhe and hiss Like fiends shut out from Eden's bliss? Better the freeman's lowliest ge as accursed-- Day shall be cheerless — no repose At night thy swollen eye shall close-- Lift to indignant Heaven thine eye, Curse God in black despair and die! Kentucky, hast thou son so base Thy fame unsullied would disgrace? Attaint his blood, disown his race, His line, his very name efface. Then charge! thy grand battalions
A Pass for A Rebel.--A Kentucky correspondent of the Cincinnati Times says: I heard an incident, down at Bacon Creek, the other day, which illustrates the character of the secessionists, and the vigorous policy pursued by Gen. McCook. A man named Buz Rowe lives down in this region. He was early afflicted with the secession fever, and when the rebels occupied this portion of Kentucky the sickness assumed a malignant form. It was his practice to lie around a tavern at Bacon Creek Station, drink whisky, swagger, blow about Southern rights, and insult Union men. One gentleman informs me that he has seen him draw his pistol, and threaten to shoot at least twenty Union men, at as many different times. When our troops advanced to Nevin, and the rebels fell back to Green River, Buz changed his tune. He was not disposed to take up arms in behalf of the cause he represented. In fact, to secure peace and safety at home, he expressed his willingness to take the oath. On being
of his feet rested on a globe. Around him stood young ladies dressed in white, with scarfs of red and white looped on the shoulder with blue. On their heads they wore appropriate crowns. These represented the Confederate States. Missouri and Kentucky were guarded by armed soldiers. While we were gazing on this picture a dark-haired maiden, robed in black, with brow encircled by a cypress-wreath, and her delicate wrists bound with clanking chains, came, on and knelt before his majesty. Hhose worn by her sister States. He unchained this gentle girl at the bidding of his monarch, changed her crown of mourning for one of joy and liberty, and threw the Confederate flag across her, raised the flag over her and led her forward; then Kentucky advanced, took her by the hand, and led her into the ranks. Need we tell you who this maiden of sable garments was intended to represent? We leave that to be understood. If your readers cannot divine, it is owing to our description, and not t
arrest and imprisonment at Camp Chase in October, 1861, has been noticed, was released on his parole of honor about the first of November, to attend the burial of his wife, who had been long in a declining state of health. Instead of reporting himself at Camp Chase, upon the expiration of his parole, he made his way to Tennessee, and in the Memphis Avalanche of the fifteenth he publishes a letter in which he depicts the great wrongs to which he has been subjected, and concludes as follows: This much, Messrs. Editors, I have deemed proper to say for myself. I do not whine nor ask the sympathies of any one. I am loose from Yankee despotism, and with my musket in one hand and the black flag of extermination to the foe in the other, I intend to avenge my own and my country's wrongs; and, if thoughts of a murdered wife and home made desolate, do not nerve my arm to strength and execution, I should be an ignoble son of Kentucky. A. J. Morey, Editor of the Cynthiana (Ky.) News.
sentinel's warning — the foe's on the shore! Our war-drums are beaten, our bugles are blown, And our legions advance to their musical tone. By the banks of the Cumberland, slippery and red, With the death-dew of battle, and strewn with the dead, Kentucky has routed her insolent foe, And victory's star gilds the night of our woe. By those banks, that once bloomed like an Eden of joy, The demon of treason stalked forth to destroy. Our rich teeming harvests he swept in his wrath, And the blaze of ots he swept in his wrath, And the blaze of our dwellings illumined his path. Like an eagle-plumed arrow our Nemesis comes. Shout, soldiers! sound bugles! and clamor, O drums! Let the land ring aloud in the wildness of joy, And the bonfires blaze brightly-but not to destroy. For the God of the Union has prospered the right, And the cohorts of treason have melted in flight. Blow, bugles! roll, river! and tell to the sea That our swords shall not rest till Kentucky is free. Louisville Journal
Nassau, N. P., Feb. 8.--The Southern schooner Louise arrived yesterday from Charleston, and reports that the expedition under Gen. Burnside had failed, some of the gunboats having been driven ashore during a gale at North-Carolina, and seven thousand of the troops and sailors taken prisoners. The Federalists are said to have suffered another defeat at Bowling Green, three thousand having been killed and five thousand taken prisoners. The small-pox has broken out in Washington, to the great alarm of the civil and military authorities. Army and people are being vaccinated, but vaccine matter is scarce. The Federalists have gained a victory over a large body of Confederates at Mill Hill, Kentucky. Nassau Guardian, February 8.
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