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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) or search for Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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Drafting Soldiers in Mississippi.--The following is the plan adopted in Mississippi, by law, for securing volunteers: After providing for a thorough organization into companies of all able-bodied men between the ages of eighteen and fifty years, it is made the duty of each company commander, immediately after the organization of his command, to prepare a number of tickets, equal to the number of his company, one third of which shall be numbered one, one third numbered two, and one third numMississippi, by law, for securing volunteers: After providing for a thorough organization into companies of all able-bodied men between the ages of eighteen and fifty years, it is made the duty of each company commander, immediately after the organization of his command, to prepare a number of tickets, equal to the number of his company, one third of which shall be numbered one, one third numbered two, and one third numbered three. They are then to be placed in a box or hat, and be drawn by the members of the company. Those drawing number one shall constitute the first class, and shall be transferred into active service first, and the second class next, and the third class next. Any person who furnishes a substitute must take the place of the substitute in the class from which he was taken. A like classification is to be made annually, and no man shall be required to serve in the regular service for more
the party advancing along the road turned out to be the leading files of the advanced guard of the rebel forces. With these was a fine-looking officer named Loughborough, who had been sent out to drill the confederate troops in that region. This officer was marching some distance in advance of his men, and catching sight of Capt. Hunt, poured forth a torrent of imprecations, exclaiming, Come out, you dammed Yankee son of a----, and be shot! at the same time raising to his shoulder his Mississippi rifle. The Captain had a musket with him, (the ordinary smooth bore,) which he instantly levelled at his adversary. The combatants were about fifty yards apart; each fired at the same instant; the Adjutant's ball whistled close by the Captain's ear, but the Adjutant himself, with a curse upon his lips, fell dead with a bullet through his brain. So instantaneous was the death that not a limb stirred after the body touched the earth. Not less than seven shots were instantly fired at Cap
Rebel State War Contributions. J. B. Jones, of the Passport Office, writes to the Richmond Examiner, that the whole amount of contributions to the confederate army in Virginia during the last three months has not fallen short of three millions of dollars. The subjoined list comprises almost exclusively the donations made to the army of the Potomac: North-Carolina,$325,471Alabama,$317,600 Mississippi,272,670Georgia,244,885 South-Carolina,137,206Texas,87,800 Louisiana,61,950Virginia,48,070 Tennessee,17,000Florida,2,350 Arkansas,950  Total,$1,515,898 --Phil. Press, Jan. 30.
Touching Incident.--An example of almost superhuman endurance and spirit, as related by Dr. Voorhies, of Mississippi, a gentleman far too intelligent and skilful to be engaged in such a cause otherwise than in alleviating its miseries, is as follows: When at the bombardment of Fort Henry, a young Wisconsin boy, who had by some means been made a prisoner, had his arm shattered by a ball from our gunboats, he was taken to one of the huts, where Dr. Voorhies attended to him. He had just bared the bone, when an enormous shell came crashing through the hut. The little fellow, without moving a muscle, talked with firmness during the operation of sawing the bone, when another went plunging close by them. The doctor remarked that it was getting too hot for him, and picked the boy up in his arms, and carried him into one of the bomb-proofs, where the operation was completed. The only answer of the Northerner was: If you think this hot, it will be a good deal too hot for you by an
near and far: Hurrah for the bonnie Blue Flag that bears the single star! Chorus. Hurrah! hurrah I for the bonnie Blue Flag That bears the single star. As long as the Union was faithful to her trust, Like friends and like brothers, kind were we and just; But now when Northern treachery attempts our rights to mar, We hoist on high the bonnie Blue Flag that bears the single star. First, gallant South-Carolina nobly made the stand; Then came Alabama, who took her by the hand; Next quickly Mississippi, Georgia and Florida-- All raised the flag, the bonnie Blue Flag that bears a single star. Ye men of valor, gather round the banner of the right; Texas and fair Louisiana join us in the fight. Davis, our loved President, and Stephens, statesmen are; Now rally round the bonnie Blue Flag that bears a single star. And here's to brave Virginia! the Old Dominion State With the young Confederacy at length has linked her fate. Impelled by her example, now other States prepare To hoist on high
d. Jeff Davis is our President, with Stephens by his side; Brave Beauregard, our general, will join us in the ride. Our wagon is plenty big enough, the running-gear is good ; It's stuffed around with cotton, and made of Southern wood, Carolina is our driver, with Georgia by her side, Virginia will hold her flag up, and we'll all take a ride. There are Tennessee and Texas also in the ring; They wouldn't have a government where cotton wasn't king. Alabama and Florida have long ago replied; Mississippi and Louisiana are anxious for the ride. Missouri, North-Carolina, and Arkansas are slow; They must hurry, or we'll leave them, and then what will they do? There's Old Kentucky and Maryland won't make up their mind; So I reckon, after all, we'll take them up behind. The Tennessee boys are in the field, eager for the fray; They can whip the Yankee boys three to one, they say; And when they get in conflict, with Davis by their side, They'll pitch into the Yankee boys, and then you'll see t
112. the Varuna: sunk April Twenty-Fifth, 1862. by George H. Boker. Who has not heard of the dauntless Varuna? Who has not heard of the deeds she has done? Who shall not hear, while the brown Mississippi Rushes along from the snow to the sun? Crippled and leaking she entered the battle, Sinking and burning she fought through the fray, Crushed were her sides and the waves ran across her, Ere, like a death-wounded lion at bay, Sternly she closed in the last fatal grapple, Then in her triumph moved grandly away. Five of the rebels, like satellites round her, Burned in her orbit of splendor and fear; One, like the pleiad of mystical story, Shot, terror-stricken, beyond her dread sphere. We who are waiting with crowns for the victors, Though we should offer the wealth of our store, Load the Varuna from deck down to kelson, Still would be niggard, such tribute to pour On courage so boundless. It beggars possession, It knocks for just payment at heaven's bright door! Cherish the heroes w