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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 836 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 532 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 480 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 406 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 350 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 332 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 322 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 310 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 294 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Missouri (Missouri, United States) or search for Missouri (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 8 document sections:

when you is about, we is. --The Booneville correspondent of the Cincinnati Daily Commercial writes: These Missouri niggers know a great deal more than the white folks give them credit for, and whether Missouri goes for the confederacy or the Union, her slaves have learned a lesson too much to ever be useful as slaves. I was struck with the apt reply of one of a crowd who came from a big house to the road to see us pass the other day. Says I: Boys, are you all for the Union? Oh! yes, Missouri goes for the confederacy or the Union, her slaves have learned a lesson too much to ever be useful as slaves. I was struck with the apt reply of one of a crowd who came from a big house to the road to see us pass the other day. Says I: Boys, are you all for the Union? Oh! yes, massa, when you's about we is. And when Price comes, you are secesh, are you? Lor, yes, massa, we's good secesh then. Can't allow de white folks to git head niggers in dat way. The darkeys understand the whole question and the game played.
marts, the echoes leaped along The Mississippi Valley, whose vast floods Throb like the pulses of the Nation's heart, And pale Virginia, all besprinkled now With War's red baptism, to Kentucky spoke, Kentucky tried but faithful unto death To sad Missouri called, Missouri passed The kindling watchword to the vast North-west, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Who louder sang than Niagara's roar To the unconquered heights of Tennessee; Hoarse echoes, like the low sepulchral moan Of subterranean fires, distuMissouri passed The kindling watchword to the vast North-west, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Who louder sang than Niagara's roar To the unconquered heights of Tennessee; Hoarse echoes, like the low sepulchral moan Of subterranean fires, disturbed the Gulf-- The bleeding Gulf betrayed and overawed-- Then swelling loud as an Archangel's trump, Or shrill winds piping o'er the stormy flood, It thundered back from far Pacific's coast. Come to the tombs by mourning millions thronged Beneath the oak of weeping. Glorious dead Fame's cemetery holds no hero dust More dearly honored in sublime repose. Pale ashes, with a nation's tears bedewed, And fanned by sighs as numerous as the winds, The laurels that you nurture shall be green And bloom
A Yankee Trick in Missouri.--The following is told of Major Hovey of the Twenty-fourth Indiana regiment, in connection with General Pope's exploits in Missouri: While at some point near Clinton, Major Hovey took one hundred men, put them in wagons, so as to hide them from view, and then putting a few stragglers to walk, as if guarding the train, he started out. Secession, shot-gun in hand, hiding in the brush, saw the cortege, and supposed it a Federal wagon-train, poorly guarded, and henMissouri: While at some point near Clinton, Major Hovey took one hundred men, put them in wagons, so as to hide them from view, and then putting a few stragglers to walk, as if guarding the train, he started out. Secession, shot-gun in hand, hiding in the brush, saw the cortege, and supposed it a Federal wagon-train, poorly guarded, and hence an easy as well as legitimate prize. Reasoning thus, Secession walked from the brush, presented its shot-gun, and demanded a surrender, which demand was instantly met by fifty men rising from the wagons, presenting a row of glittering muskets, and requesting a similar favor of astonished and now mortified secession. Secession generally complied, and worked off its ill-humor by cursing such mean Yankee tricks, unknown to all honorable warfare, and unworthy all chivalrous hearts. In this way
scribe the first scene. A young gentleman representing King Cotton, sat upon a throne resembling a bale of cotton. Down on one side of the throne sat a representative of the ebon race, with a basket of cotton. The king held a cotton cloth as a sceptre, and one of his feet rested on a globe. Around him stood young ladies dressed in white, with scarfs of red and white looped on the shoulder with blue. On their heads they wore appropriate crowns. These represented the Confederate States. Missouri and Kentucky were guarded by armed soldiers. While we were gazing on this picture a dark-haired maiden, robed in black, with brow encircled by a cypress-wreath, and her delicate wrists bound with clanking chains, came, on and knelt before his majesty. He extended his sceptre, and she arose. He waved his wand again, and an armed soldier appeared with a scarf and crown, like those worn by her sister States. He unchained this gentle girl at the bidding of his monarch, changed her crown
soldiers who have risked their lives in the present war. New-Jersey in 1862, as in 1776, is not a whit behind her sister States in true patriotic feeling and love for the Union. The articles contained in the box will be found enumerated in another column. Hightstown, February 24, 1862. J. Swaim, Esq.: Sir: You will find inclosed a duplicate list of articles contained in our box, which, according to previous arrangement, we have this day forwarded to your laboratory to be sent by you to Missouri for the sick and wounded soldiers. The great need existing among the soldiers of the West for aid of this description has stimulated us to renewed efforts in their behalf, and if we can only hear that our box has been of some little service, we shall be fully repaid for our labor and expense. Our association has sent several boxes to the Potomac, but we resolved that this one should go where, from recent events, it is likely to be more needed, and the appeal in your newspapers strengthe
bloodshed they'd distress us! Fight away, etc. Abe Lincoln tore through Baltimore, In a baggage-car with fastened door; Fight away, etc. And left his wife alas! alack! To perish on the railroad track! Fight away, etc. Abe Lincoln is the President, He'll wish his days in Springfield spent; Fight away, etc. We'll show him that Old Scott's a fool, We'll never submit to Yankee rule! Fight away, etc. At first our States were only seven, But now we number stars eleven; Fight away, etc. Brave old Missouri shall be ours, Despite old Lincoln's Northern powers I Fight away, etc. We have no ships, we have no navies, But mighty faith in the great Jeff. Davis; Fight away, etc. Due honor too we will award, To gallant Bragg and Beauregard! Fight away, etc. Abe's proclamation in a twinkle, Stirred up the blood of Rip Van Winkle; Fight away, etc. Jeff Davis' answer was short and curt “Fort Sumter's taken, and nobody's hurt! ” Fight away, etc. We hear the words of this same ditty, To the right and lef
General Paine's Reply. Col. Kellogg, Commanding, Cape Girardeau: Hang one of the rebel cavalry for each Union man murdered; and, after this, two for each. Continue to scout, capture, and kill. E. A. Paine, Brigadier-General Commanding. Cairo, February 8. That's laconic and specific. Had this policy been pursued from the start, rebels would have been scarce in Missouri. I hope Gen. Hitchcock, Gen. Paine's successor, will act out the example of General, now Colonel Paine.--Cleveland Plaindealer.
s side; Brave Beauregard, our general, will join us in the ride. Our wagon is plenty big enough, the running-gear is good ; It's stuffed around with cotton, and made of Southern wood, Carolina is our driver, with Georgia by her side, Virginia will hold her flag up, and we'll all take a ride. There are Tennessee and Texas also in the ring; They wouldn't have a government where cotton wasn't king. Alabama and Florida have long ago replied; Mississippi and Louisiana are anxious for the ride. Missouri, North-Carolina, and Arkansas are slow; They must hurry, or we'll leave them, and then what will they do? There's Old Kentucky and Maryland won't make up their mind; So I reckon, after all, we'll take them up behind. The Tennessee boys are in the field, eager for the fray; They can whip the Yankee boys three to one, they say; And when they get in conflict, with Davis by their side, They'll pitch into the Yankee boys, and then you'll see them slide. Our cause is just and holy, our men are