hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 8 document sections:

when the ocean moves His moist battalions to the tempest's march, To storm the fortress of the rocky isles, And hosts innumerable thronged around In panoply of war. From every height And every valley, rolled the martial drum, And bugles calling to the gory charge The loyal and the bold, while streamed on high Gay banners glittering with the hues of heaven. “We come, O bleeding country!” was their cry, “To beat aside the parricidal steel, And shield the snowy breast that gave us life.” New-England's seamen swelled the rallying cry Along the coasts, the Middle States replied From thronging marts, the echoes leaped along The Mississippi Valley, whose vast floods Throb like the pulses of the Nation's heart, And pale Virginia, all besprinkled now With War's red baptism, to Kentucky spoke, Kentucky tried but faithful unto death To sad Missouri called, Missouri passed The kindling watchword to the vast North-west, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Who louder sang than Niagara's roar To the uncon
New-England, having patiently turned cheek after cheek to the buffeting of Southern arrogance, cannot be very seriously blamed now for returning the compliment with its gallant Foote. Cincinnati Gazette, February 27.
Religious music Among the Soldiers.--A letter from Hatteras Inlet (N. C.) says: The New-England troops excel in the musical faculty, and in every regiment from Massachusetts, Connecticut or New-Hampshire, music-teachers or good singers abound, and many an otherwise tedious evening has thus been beguiled by the elevating influence of music. In this respect no regiment, perhaps, is more favored than the Massachusetts Twenty-third, composed chiefly of Salem, Marblehead, Danvers and Boston men. Many of the officers were members of the best musical societies, and leaders or pillars in their church choirs kat home. Could their friends have looked in upon us on board of the Highlander, during many of the boisterous nights we have been anchored in this Sound, while the storm howled without, they might have heard: “Perhaps Dundee's wild, warbling measures rise, Or plaintive Martyrs, worthy of the name, Or noble Elgin beat the heavenward flame.” On board of the Huzzar, which carries
Badly Frightened.--The city of Montreal was thrown into a terrible panic on the twenty-sixth of December, by a report that war had been declared by the United States against England, and that an army of twenty thousand New-England troops was marching towards that city from Vermont. Dubuque Times, January 4.
dealt traitors death. Lead the worn war-horse by the plumed bier-- Even his horse, now he is dead, is dear! Take him, New-England, now his work is done. He fought the Good Fight valiantly — and won. Speak of his daring. This man held his blood Chea woman's, for a friend: Intolerant of every base desire: Ice where he liked not; where he loved, all fire. Take him, New-England, gently. Other days, Peaceful and prosperous, shall give him praise. How will our children's children breathe his namren's children breathe his name, Bright on the shadowy muster-roll of fame! Take him, New-England, gently; you can fold No purer patriot in your soft brown mould. So, on New-England's bosom, let him lie, Sleeping awhile — as if the Good could die! ren's children breathe his name, Bright on the shadowy muster-roll of fame! Take him, New-England, gently; you can fold No purer patriot in your soft brown mould. So, on New-England's bosom, let him lie, Sleeping awhile — as if the Good could
hth, Ninth, Eleventh, Eighteenth, Twentieth, Twenty-ninth, Thirtieth, Thirty-first, Forty-fifth, Forty-eighth and Forty-ninth Illinois regiments. The Eighth, Eighteenth, Twentieth and Thirty-first Illinois regiments occupied a position above the Fort. The four Illinois regiments held their ground full three hours. Nearly one third had been killed and wounded. Yet the balance stood firm. O gales that dash th‘ Atlantic's swell Along our rocky shores! Whose thunders diapason well New-England's glad hurrahs-- Bear to the prairies of the West The echoes of our joy, The prayer that springs in every breast: “God bless thee--Illinois!” Oh! awful hours, when grape and shell Tore through th' unflinching line; “Stand firm, remove the men who fell, Close up and wait the sign.” It came at last, “Now lads the steel!” The rushing hosts deploy; “Charge, boys!” --the broken traitors reel-- Huzza for Illinois! In vain thy rampart, Donelson, The living torrent bars; It l
owe him pay. ”In God's hand alone is vengeance, But he strikes with the hands of men, And his blight would wither our manhood If we smite not the smiter again. ”By the graves where our fathers slumber, By the shrines where our mothers prayed, By our homes, and hopes, and freedom, Let every man swear on his blade, ”That he will not sheath nor stay it, Till from point to hilt it glow With the flush of Almighty vengeance In the blood of the felon foe.“ They swore — and the answering sunlight Leaped red from their lifted swords, And the hate in their hearts made echo To the wrath in their burning words. There's weeping in all New-England, And by Schuylkill's banks a knell, And the widows there and the orphans How the oath was kept can tell. It may add something to the interest with which these stirring lines will be read to know that they were composed within the walls of a yankee Bastile. They reach us in manuscript, through the courtesy of a returned prisoner. Richmond
An avalanche of Adjectives.--The driveling but devilish spirit of New-England Abolitionism excites mingled feelings of pity, contempt, and scorn. The war which Lincoln is now waging upon the South is one of the most unrighteous, atrocious, and unjustifiable recorded in history. The guilt of its unnumbered and heaven-daring crimes rests heavily upon the head of the besotted tyrant by whom it is prosecuted for the gratification of his own unhallowed ambition and wicked revenge. The Ruler of the Universe certainly never designed that a mongrel race, composed of the debris of all the nations of Europe, swept upon its shores by the waves of the Atlantic — infidel and God-defying; presumptuous and Bible-ignoring; rife with every error and pernicious ism; cowardly, cruel, and treacherous — should exercise despotic authority over a Christian people.--Memphis Avalanch