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Confederate Wags.--The Cairo (Ill.) correspondence abounds in such incidents as the following: Many amusing illustrations of rural simplicity were witnessed among the prisoners. A newsboy rushed on board the T. L. Magill, just arrived from Donelson, vociferously shouting: Here's yer mornin'papers. A stalwart Tennesseean shouted: Give me the Appeal. He really believed he could buy the Memphis and New-Orleans papers at Cairo, and when told they were not for sale, earnestly remarked: Why,Cairo, and when told they were not for sale, earnestly remarked: Why, the last time I was here, I bought all our papers here. Are ye afeard to sell ‘m? Another individual bought a ten-cent pie from a poor woman, and tendered her in payment ten dollars in confederate scrip, at the same time stretching forth his hand for nine dollars and ninety cents in change. The pastry-merchant declined the proffered bill; when the Southerner assured her: I took fur good as gold. It passes down our way right enough. A third prisoner having written a letter to his wife, got
Making War in dead Earnest. Cairo, February 14, 1862. The following facts and correspondence show the exasperated nature of the war in these parts. Soon the cry will be: No quarter! Col. Kellogg, commanding at Cape Girardeau, telegraphed to Acting Brig.-Gen. Paine, at Cairo, thus: Yesterday (February eighth) sCairo, thus: Yesterday (February eighth) several companies of our cavalry, with one company of Ross's infantry, scoured the country west, bringing in fifty prisoners. Our cavalry also encountered a large force of rebel cavalry, fifteen miles below Bloomfield. They succeeded in routing them, killing seven, wounding many, and taking twenty prisoners. We had two missing and ncountered a large force of rebel cavalry, fifteen miles below Bloomfield. They succeeded in routing them, killing seven, wounding many, and taking twenty prisoners. We had two missing and one wounded. They found five bodies, known to be Union men, murdered. W. P. Kellogg, Colonel Commanding. Gen. E. A. Paine, Commanding, Cairo.
General Paine's Reply. Col. Kellogg, Commanding, Cape Girardeau: Hang one of the rebel cavalry for each Union man murdered; and, after this, two for each. Continue to scout, capture, and kill. E. A. Paine, Brigadier-General Commanding. Cairo, February 8. That's laconic and specific. Had this policy been pursued from the start, rebels would have been scarce in Missouri. I hope Gen. Hitchcock, Gen. Paine's successor, will act out the example of General, now Colonel Paine.--Cleveland Plaindealer.
Gen. Halleck on Retaliation.--Colonel Kellogg wrote to Gen. Paine, commanding at Cairo, Ill., that the cavalry under his command had discovered that the rebels had murdered five Union men; Gen. Paine replied: Hang one of the rebel cavalry for each Union man murdered, and after this kill two for each. Continue to scout, capture, and kill. Gen. Halleck has issued a general order, strongly disapproving of Gen. Paine's order, which is very properly characterized as contrary to the rules of civilized war, and if its spirit should be adopted, the whole country would be covered with blood. Gen. Halleck also blamed the officer mentioned for furnishing the correspondence to the press, and declared that any officer who publishes, without proper authority, information respecting the movements of the armies, even of battles won, or any official papers, will be arrested and tried by a court-martial. N. Y. World, March 4.
Munchauseniana. Memphis, Jan. 9, 1862.--A mercantile firm here has received a letter from a friend in the south of Kentucky, stating that the Federal Government had made clandestine arrangements, and pardoned convicts and desperate characters of the North, to scatter them through the South, and set fire and burn everything, especially manufactures and machine-shops. The Unionists were paying them liberally for such work, believing it a good mode to cripple the South. The information was obtained from a party employed under the Federal Government, and was communicated to warn the South. Twenty Union officers resigned at Cairo on Saturday, and have gone home. Memphis Appeal, Jan. 9.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Incidents of the Fort Donelson fight. (search)
and he held three chickens which he had captured. A steward of one of the boats stepped up to him and asked him if he wanted to sell the chickens. He looked at the chickens for a little while and replied, Well, no; I had so much trouble in catching the d — d things, I believe I'll eat 'em myself; and off he went with his fowl prisoners. Orderly-Sergeant Charles A. Bedard, company H, of the immortal Eleventh Illinois, was killed in the morning fight of the fifteenth inst. He was a brother of Frank W. Bedard, of the St. Charles Hotel, at Cairo. His bravery and coolness on the field during a most terrific fire from the enemy are spoken of in the most praiseworthy terms by officers and men. His only attention during the severest of the fight appeared to be in keeping his men in line, and prevent disorder in the ranks, moving along in the face of the foe, watching with a jealous care his men in charge, as on he pushed, loading, firing, and re-loading his piece.--Louisville Journal.
Incidents of Fort Donelson.--After the surrender, when the prisoners were being congregated for transportation to Cairo and other points, before all had been disarmed, an attempt was made to assassinate one of our officers, Major Mudd, of the Second Illinois cavalry, who was shot in the back by some of the rebels. The case being reported to Gen. Grant, an order was immediately issued for disarming all rebels, including the side-arms of their officers. Upon learning this order, Buckner, the chivalrous, repaired to the headquarters of Gen. Grant, and in insolent tones demanded to know if such an order had been issued. Upon being informed that it had, he launched off into a strain of furious invectives, in which he charged that the order was barbarous, inhuman, and brutal, and at variance with rules of civilized warfare. The man was permitted to indulge in his raving to an extravagant extent, because he was a prisoner, without any reply from Gen. Grant. Capt. Rawlins, A. A. Ge