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Doc. 35.-occupation of Rogersville, Ala. General Mitchel's report. headquarters Third division, Huntsville, Ala., camp Taylor, May 15. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: At six P. M. on the thirteenth instant, General Negley's expedition from Pulaski, supported by Col. Little's expedition from Athens, entered Rogersville, driving the enemy across the Tennessee and destroying a portion of the ferry-boats. Having learned of the approach of Col. Little's force, the enemy succeeded in removing their artillery, baggage and stores before the arrival of Gen. Negley. I expected an obstinate defence at the passage of the Elk River, and accompanied Col. Little in person, but without crossing. The enemy, as usual, fled at our approach. I ordered yesterday an expedition to move promptly from Rogersville to seize the bridge across Shad Creek, and the ferry below the mouth of the same stream. This duty has been promptly executed, and the ferry and bridge are ours. No more tr
part of the troops under his command. This gallant officer, with portions of the First, Fourth, and Ninth Virginia cavalry, a part of the Jeff Davis Legion, with whom were the Boykin Rangers and a section of the Stuart horse artillery, on the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth of June, made a reconnaissance between the Pamunkey and Chickahominy Rivers, and succeeded in passing around the rear of the whole of the Union army, routing the enemy in a series of skirmishes, taking a number of priheir arrival at the Libby prison there were found to be one hundred and forty-five Yankees and sixteen negroes. We give the names of the officers, together with their rank and the place of their capture. They were all taken on Friday, the thirteenth instant; Capt. James Magrath, company G, of the Forty-second New-York, and Lieut. John Price, of the Forty-second New-York, were captured at Tunstall's station, on the York River Railroad; Lieut. H. B. Masters, of the Fifty-fifth New-York, at the W
ded to Chattanooga, permit me to submit the following report of such portion of the attack on this post, made on the thirteenth inst., as came under my own personal observation: I arrived here, after an absence of two months, on the afternoon of try to proceed at once to Lebanon. The total effective strength of the command at Murfreesboro on the morning of the thirteenth inst., did not therefore exceed eight hundred and fourteen men, including pickets. The attack was made at daybreak on the morning of the thirteenth inst., by the Second cavalry brigade C. S.A., Brig.-Gen. N. B. Forrest, over three thousand strong, consisting of one Texas regiment, Lieut.-Col. Walker, the First and Second Georgia regiments, Cols. Wharton and Hood, one General Buell's order. headquarters army of the Ohio, in camp, Huntsville, Ala., July 21, 1862. On the thirteenth instant the force at Murfreesboro, under command of Brigadier-General T. T. Crittenden, late Colonel of the Sixth Indiana r
Kentucky cavalry, Doctors J. C. Fraser, A. Adams, W. O. Smith, J. A. Kirkpatrick, John A. Lair, and----McLeod, for their unremitting attention to the wounded, and to the ladies of Cynthiana unbounded praise is due, for their untiring ministrations upon the wounded, etc. I have the honor to be, with much respect, your obedient servant, J. J. Landrum, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding. Captain Wright's report. Mayor Hatch and the Committee of Safety: gentlemen: On Sunday, the thirteenth inst., I received an order from you, under which I proceeded to raise a company for a ten days trip to defend Lexington. On Tuesday, the fifteenth instant, the Pendleton Guards and Bates's Light Guards were consolidated and placed under my command; Messrs. Williams and McGrew of the Bates's Light Guards acting Lieutenants. At the Fourteenth Ward Armory the company was armed with cheap muskets, also received a blouse and cap for each man. No time was given to organize or make a roll; but the
rigade upon its bank and awaited orders. On the morning of the thirteenth, finding Crooked Creek and Robinson's River fordable for my caval the morning of the thirteenth of September. On the night of the thirteenth, after the evacuation of Maryland Heights, Col. Miles directed Castly shrapnel; had lost about one hundred rounds on Saturday, the thirteenth, by the explosion of a limber caused by one of the enemy's shellsave to abandon them. That as late as eleven o'clock A. M. of the thirteenth, a few hours previous to the abandonment of this position, Coloneate to the enemy. Sixteen of these prisoners were paroled on the thirteenth, and a pass given them in the hand-writing of Col. Miles, while ahat in obedience to an order of Major-General Gilbert, on the thirteenth instant, at eleven o'clock P. M. left the depot of the Louisville andur orders I left Frederick with my regiment on the morning of the thirteenth, and took position about three miles on the Jefferson road. I he
. A reconnoissance on the morning of the twelfth found the enemy had withdrawn during the night, in the direction of the Rapidan River. I followed them as rapidly as possible, as soon as this was ascertained, but only succeeded in discovering their rear-guard of cavalry in full flight. Having advanced some six miles, as far as Crooked Creek, and finding it impassable, on account of the previous heavy rains, encamped my brigade upon its bank and awaited orders. On the morning of the thirteenth, finding Crooked Creek and Robinson's River fordable for my cavalry and artillery, I crossed my infantry on slight bridges, hastily constructed. When about eight hundred yards south of Robinson's River, I was obliged to halt my brigade, with the exception of the cavalry, on the bank of a narrow and deep creek emptying into Robinson's River. The bottom of this creek where it crossed the road was composed of mud worn into deep holes, thus rendering it impassable for my artillery. In th
llan established his headquarters at Frederick City on the morning of the thirteenth of September. On the night of the thirteenth, after the evacuation of Maryland Heights, Col. Miles directed Captain (now Major) Russell, of the Maryland cavalry, tod some ammunition — could not tell what amount, but mostly shrapnel; had lost about one hundred rounds on Saturday, the thirteenth, by the explosion of a limber caused by one of the enemy's shells. Captain Rigby had expended during the siege of Harp, and unless relieved or otherwise ordered, he would have to abandon them. That as late as eleven o'clock A. M. of the thirteenth, a few hours previous to the abandonment of this position, Colonel Miles said to Col. Ford that he (Colonel Ford) couldportant facts they could, and undoubtedly did communicate to the enemy. Sixteen of these prisoners were paroled on the thirteenth, and a pass given them in the hand-writing of Col. Miles, while a rebel officer by the name of Rouse, after an escape i
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. (search)
r side-arms and all private property, and four days rations. Officers and men were immediately paroled, and are about to start for the Ohio River. I have the honor to be, your ob't servant, J. T. Wilder, Colonel Commanding U. S. Forces at Green River. Colonel Dunham's report. Louisville, Ky., September 30, 1862. To the A. A. General and Chief of Staff of the Army of Kentucky: sir: I have the honor to report that in obedience to an order of Major-General Gilbert, on the thirteenth instant, at eleven o'clock P. M. left the depot of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad with six companies of the Fiftieth regiment Indiana volunteers, and one company (K) of the Seventy-eighth Indiana, attached to the Fiftieth for duty — in all four hundred and forty-six strong, rank and file — for Green River, near Munfordville, to reenforce Col. Wilder in defence of that point. The train ran very slowly until some distance below Elizabethtown, when I went forward and earnestly urged the e
ble service of Capt. Redington, of the Sixtieth New-York, and First Lieutenant McGregor, of the Seventy-eighth New-York, the two last having charge of the skirmishers. Respectfully submitted. Charles R. Brundage, Lieutenant Commanding Third Brigade. Lieut.-Colonel Kimball's report. headquarters Ninth New-York volunteers, near Sharpsburgh, Md., Sept. 20, 1862. Colonel: I beg to report that in accordance with your orders I left Frederick with my regiment on the morning of the thirteenth, and took position about three miles on the Jefferson road. I here received orders from Colonel Rush, of the United States Lancers, to reconnoitre the enemy, who was reported in front in position with artillery and cavalry. I did so by throwing forward company B, Lieut. Bartholomew, on the left, who soon reported the enemy as having left the position he occupied the night before, with three guns and a small cavalry force, and the road in front clear. Meanwhile, I detached companies C an
, wounded and dying. In places they were piled up on each other. We retired in perfect order, each regiment and brigade in proper position, to Camp Dick Robinson and its vicinity, where our army was concentrated. Our loss in killed, wounded and missing will not reach two thousand five hundred. The killed in Cheatham's division number two hundred and nine and about one thousand two hundred and fifty wounded. This division suffered most. At half-past 4 o'clock on Monday morning, thirteenth instant, Col. Tyler left Gen. Polk, and of subsequent events he is of course not advised. Tennesseeans in this fierce conflict maintained their ancient reputation for distinguished valor, not only maintaining it, but winning new and imperishable laurels. The instances of individual valor occurring among these troops in this bloody conflict would fill a volume. Polk, Cheatham, Donelson, and all our leaders were every where seen cheering on our troops with reckless exposure of their perso
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