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hree miles above. The regiment obeyed, and as will subsequently be seen, did their work. A brief allusion as to what we hoped to find at or near Hanover is proper here. As late as Sunday, the twenty-fifth instant, a strong brigade of rebels had been posted there, believed to be composed of six North-Carolina regiments, commanded by Lawrence O'Brien Branch, formerly member of Congress, but more latterly brigadier-general, with the smell of defeat upon his garments, he having encountered Burnside at Newbern in March last, the retreat from which, it will be seen, did not prove to be his last march. His regiments are: Seventh, Twelfth, Eighteenth, Twenty-eighth, Thirty-third, and Thirty-eighth North-Carolina State troops. Their strength is represented by members of the same to approach nearly to the maximum standard of one thousand men each. This force was certainly all at Hanover on Sunday. From secession, but reliable sources, we learn further that it was the intention of the en
rt to-day is, that he is concentrating a large force in the Mechanicsville road. We are ready for him there, and at all other points. Our army is large, full of valor, officered by the best talent, and the siege of Richmond — for such it will continue to be — will witness many desperate sorties. We hope much from the counter-irritation commenced by Jackson. A number of iron-clad gunboats are now not far from Drewry's Bluff, ready to participate in the assault, whenever made. We hear of Burnside's landing below Petersburgh, and of Beauregard's retreating thirty-five miles from Corinth, but the news lacks confirmation. The city is one vast hospital. Woman's ministering hands are not wanting to alleviate the sufferings of our wounded. Hermes. Memphis appeal account. Richmond, Tuesday, June 8, 1862. The ostensible reason for abandoning the line of the Chickahominy, in the retreat from Yorktown, was, that in the event of a general action, Gen. Joe Johnston did not desir
ose who adhered to the Union cause wiped out. Encouraged by various wealthy men living in the outskirts of the town, they have become emboldened of late, and have made occasional reconnoissances, apparently with the intention of attacking the place. The cavalry sent up for the protection of the town had a considerable skirmish, only some two weeks ago, within five or six miles of the town. Pending the armistice which was agreed upon, while the Union prisoners were being delivered to Gen. Burnside, a considerable force of cavalry and infantry have been gathering near Pactolus, under command of the rebel Col. Singletary; and Col. Potter, commanding the forces at Washington, deemed it proper to send for reinforcements. Accordingly, on Tuesday and Wednesday last, all the remaining companies of the Twenty-fourth Massachusetts at Newbern were despatched to Washington. Lieut. Avery, of the marine artillery, with three of Wiard's twelve-pounder boat-howitzers, and a party of artilleris
, 1862. To Gen. Pope: I have just sent General Burnside's reply. Gen. Cox's forces are coming ineft, and what connection must be kept up with Burnside. It has been my purpose to conform my operatnd to the left and front, by command of Major-Gen. Burnside, in three columns, and took up a new poe bridge. This was immediately ordered by Gen. Burnside, and Gen. Wilcox came promptly forward wit express my obligation to the gentlemen on Gen. Burnside's staff for the intelligence, courage and scover for themselves. Up to three o'clock Burnside had made little progress. His attack on the 'clock, McClellan sent simultaneous orders to Burnside and Franklin — to the former to advance and cd back having been dispelled, the movement of Burnside became at once the turning-point of success, or in any manner cooperate with each other. Burnside hesitated for hours in front of the bridge wh the battle was over. Only a solitary gun of Burnside's thundered against the enemy, and presently [40 more...]
the forces which had arrived at Falmouth under General Burnside, joined me. I immediately pushed forward my why approve your movement. I hope to push a part of Burnside's forces to near Barnett's Ford by to-morrow night Washington. To Gen. Pope: I have telegraphed Gen. Burnside to know at what hour he can reinforce Reno. Am g. 21, 1862. To Gen. Pope: I have just sent General Burnside's reply. Gen. Cox's forces are coming in fromgun, and that I must take care to keep united with Burnside on my left, so that no movement to separate us couan help it, but must be so as long as I am tied to Burnside's forces, not yet wholly arrived at Fredericksburgish left, and what connection must be kept up with Burnside. It has been my purpose to conform my operations the tremendous fire that met them. But one of General Burnside's veteran brigades coming up soon after dark, my of Gen. McClellan, but by the fresh corps of Gens. Burnside and Hunter. After forced marches, with inadequ
anawha division, Ninth army corps, Sept. 20, 1862. Lieutenant-Colonel L. Richmond, A. A.G., General Burnside's Headquarters, Right Wing Army of the Potomac: sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Kanawha division, Ninth army corps, Major-General Burnside commanding, in the battle of South-Mountain: At six o'clock on the morning of September fourteenth, ade. A. T. A. Torbert, Colonel First New-Jersey Volunteers, Commanding First Brigade. General Burnside's order on the death of General Reno. headquarters of Ninth army corps, Mouth of Antiee public mourning for the death of one of the country's best defenders. By command of Major-General Burnside. Lewis Richmond, Assistant Adjutant-General. New-York times account. on the ba for the purpose of getting round the enemy's right. At this juncture Generals McClellan and Burnside, with their staffs, rode upon the field, where they remained during the continuance of the batt
ed the troops engaged, I sent a request to Gen. Burnside that Wilcox's division, which had been hele bridge. This was immediately ordered by Gen. Burnside, and Gen. Wilcox came promptly forward witnce with his own corps. Meantime where was Burnside, and what was he doing? On the right where IPorter's guns in the centre, but nothing from Burnside on the left. The distance was, perhaps, too Here was the difference between Smith and Burnside. The former did his work at once, and lost ad back having been dispelled, the movement of Burnside became at once the turning-point of success, ove send an angry tempest of shell down among Burnside's guns and men. He has formed his columns appstand fast and fire. More infantry comes up; Burnside is outnumbered, flanked, compelled to yield ty from the left. He sees clearly enough that Burnside is pressed — needs no messenger to tell him t; not half an hour of daylight is left. Till Burnside's message came it had seemed plain to every o[26 more...]
very narrow escapes. This victory is of great importance, inasmuch as it clears the way to Weldon. It is impossible to estimate the loss to the enemy, who, it is said, left some forty or fifty dead on the field. Since the departure of Gen. Burnside with a part of his army for Virginia, Acting Major-Gen. Foster, the wheel-horse of the Burnside expedition, is chief officer in command of this department. This is said to be a permanent arrangement, as it is understood that Gen. Burnside wi, inasmuch as it clears the way to Weldon. It is impossible to estimate the loss to the enemy, who, it is said, left some forty or fifty dead on the field. Since the departure of Gen. Burnside with a part of his army for Virginia, Acting Major-Gen. Foster, the wheel-horse of the Burnside expedition, is chief officer in command of this department. This is said to be a permanent arrangement, as it is understood that Gen. Burnside will be continued hereafter in a more active field of labor.
wounded were brought to the hospital. From the top of a house the sight was magnificent, nothing but moving masses of men and gleaming bayonets visible — surging along like the flood-tide on a sandy beach--forty thousand men must have been in Burnside's corps. What a change then appeared in our truly rescued city! Flags of all size, and from every conceivable place, were displayed; stores were opened, and the houses were opened unanimously, and our tired soldiers fed in truly hotel style. rs fed in truly hotel style. When Burnside rode through, the acclamations were universal, but nothing to the reception given McClellan when he entered some time after. Bouquets were thrown; men, women and children rushed to him, he bowing and speaking to all; girls embracing his horse's neck, and kissing the animal, only because they could not reach the General. The reception given to the troops was most inspiring to them, as it had been believed by them that Maryland was not truly loyal.