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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Meade or search for Meade in all documents.

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ral Robert E. Lee, crossed the river at Mechanicsville bridge, Meadow bridge, and at Atlee's, and between one and two o'clock attacked our flank. Two regiments of Meade's brigade (McCall's division) were in reserve, and one on picket-duty. They did not at any time fully engage the enemy. General Reynolds's brigade held the righty. His wounds were bound on the field, and he remained in the saddle and in the fiery torrent. Col. Wyman, too, of the Eighteenth Massachusetts, was killed. General Meade was severely wounded. How many others I cannot tell. It was a bloody day. There will be weeping at many a hearthstone, and many a loved one was lost who willught for long and never found. Sumner, and Heintzelman, and Franklin, and Hooker, and Smith, and Sedgwick, and Franklin, and McCall — Hancock, and Davidson, and Meade, and Seymore, and Burns, and Sickles, and Sully, and Owens, and dead Wyman, and all the galaxy of brave leaders, won title to glorious honors. They tell me that t
ility throughout the operations, and performed his duties in all situations with zeal and fidelity. Generals Seymour and Meade of that division, in like manner performed their duties with ability and gallantry, and in all fidelity to the Governmentr formed his lines with precision and without hesitation. Ricketts's division went into the woods on the left in force. Meade with the Pennsylvania reserves formed in the centre. Doubleday was sent out on the right, planting his guns on the hill,dawn. Morning found both armies just as they had slept, almost close enough to look into each other's eyes. The left of Meade's reserves and the right of Ricketts's line became engaged at nearly the same moment, one with artillery, the other with nce, and across the road, and then back again into the dark woods which closed around them went the retreating rebels. Meade and his Pennsylvanians followed hard and fast — followed till they came within easy range of the woods, among which they
f the conduct of the other officers commanding divisions or brigades of Porter's corps, I know nothing, having received no report from that officer of the operations of his corps. Brig.-General John F. Reynolds, commanding the Pennsylvania reserves, merits the highest commendation at my hands. Prompt, active, and energetic, he commanded his division with distinguished ability throughout the operations, and performed his duties in all situations with zeal and fidelity. Generals Seymour and Meade of that division, in like manner performed their duties with ability and gallantry, and in all fidelity to the Government and to the army. General Sturgis arrived at Warrenton Junction on the twenty-sixth of August with Piatt's brigade of his division, the only portion of that division which ever joined me. This brigade was temporarily attached to the army corps of Fitz-John Porter, and although misled in consequence of orders to follow Griffin's brigade of that corps, which, for some unexp
ner than it was expected. General Hooker formed his lines with precision and without hesitation. Ricketts's division went into the woods on the left in force. Meade with the Pennsylvania reserves formed in the centre. Doubleday was sent out on the right, planting his guns on the hill, and opening at once on a rebel battery thr the shock. The battle began with the dawn. Morning found both armies just as they had slept, almost close enough to look into each other's eyes. The left of Meade's reserves and the right of Ricketts's line became engaged at nearly the same moment, one with artillery, the other with infantry. A battery was almost immediatel dead and wounded behind them, over the fence, and across the road, and then back again into the dark woods which closed around them went the retreating rebels. Meade and his Pennsylvanians followed hard and fast — followed till they came within easy range of the woods, among which they saw their beaten enemy disappearing — foll