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Doc. 36.-seizure of the Planter. Flag-officer Du Pont's report. flag-ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbor, S. C., May 14, 1862. sir: I enclose a copy of a report from Commander E. G. Parrott, brought here last night by the late rebel steam-tug Planter, in charge of an officer and crew from the Augusta. She was the armed despatch and transportation steamer attached to the Engineer Department at Charleston under Brig.--Gen. Ripley, whose barge a short time since was brought out to the blockading fleet by several contrabands. The bringing out this steamer, under all the circumstances, would have done credit to any one. At four in the morning, in the absence of the captain, who was on shore, she left her wharf, close to the government office and headquarters, with Palmetto and confederate flag flying — passed the successive forts, saluting, as usual, by blowing her steam-whistle. After getting beyond the range of the last gun she quietly hauled down the rebel flags and hoi
ver Creek, about twelve feet wide and waist-deep, ran along the front and left flank of the enemy's position, while from the creek to the battery was covered with abattis. The position was most formidable. The assault was made by Pender's brigade, of A. P. Hill's division, on the right, and by Ripley's brigade on the right in front. Gen. Pender's brigade had been thrown out in advance, in observation on the enemy's left, when Ripley's brigade coming up, Gen. D. H. Hill ordered two of Gen. Ripley's regiments — the Forty-fourth Georgia and the First North-Carolina--to operate on the right with Gen. Pender, while the Forty-eighth Georgia and the Third North-Carolina remained in front. Gen. Lee then ordered the battery to be charged. The attempt was made. They all moved forward to the attack together. They cleared the rifle-pits and gained the creek, within one hundred yards of the battery; but there was still the creek and the abattis to cross. The fire of shot, shell, canist
his day by a gunboat slowly going up the Stono. May 25.--Gunboats to this time had been running up the Stono for several miles every day, shelling both sides of the river, and returning in the evening to Battery Island. Effort to-day of Brig.-Gen. Ripley to draw them within effective reach of guns of Fort Pemberton, failed. Gallantry of Capt. Frank Bonneau, and the men of our little floating battery, stationed for the day in the creek near Dixon's Island, remarked. A gunboat which engaged the battery, was driven off in a few minutes. The battery was moored to the land. Three gunboats had been drawn up the river a short distance, by Gen. Ripley's movements. On their return, they had passed by all together, when one came back, apparently to learn what was the little dark object across the marshes and the small islands. Capt. B., who was aboard, had just received orders not to fire unless attacked. He had his men ashore, under cover. The gunboat opened on him. Capt. B. promp
, of North-Carolina; General Lawton, of Georgia, in leg; General Wright, of Georgia, in leg; General Ripley, of South-Carolina, in throat; Colonel Duncan McRea, who succeeded Ripley in command, slightRipley in command, slightly; Colonel Magill, of Georgia regulars, lost an arm; Majors Sorrell and Walton, of Longstreet's staff; Colonel Gordon and Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot, of the Sixth Alabama, Captain Reedy, of the Thightfoot's of Sixth Alabama; Major-General Anderson's, Brigadier-General Anderson's, and Brigadier-General Ripley's. I have omitted to mention, in the proper place, that Major Robert S. Smith and Li in breast and leg. Brig.-Gen. Lawton, in leg. Brig.-Gen. Armistead, in the foot. Brig.-Gen. Ripley, in neck, not dangerously. Brig.-Gen. Ransome, of North-Carolina, slightly. Col. Alffifteen miles from Baldwin, where he joined Van Dorn; moved to Pocahontas, thirty miles, leaving Ripley a little on the left; was there joined by General Lovell, and moved down to Chewalla, and from t
rigadier-General Anderson, of North-Carolina; General Lawton, of Georgia, in leg; General Wright, of Georgia, in leg; General Ripley, of South-Carolina, in throat; Colonel Duncan McRea, who succeeded Ripley in command, slightly; Colonel Magill, of GeRipley in command, slightly; Colonel Magill, of Georgia regulars, lost an arm; Majors Sorrell and Walton, of Longstreet's staff; Colonel Gordon and Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot, of the Sixth Alabama, Captain Reedy, of the Third Alabama, (wounded and missing at Boonesboro Gap;) Colonel Alfred Cummingand Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot's of Sixth Alabama; Major-General Anderson's, Brigadier-General Anderson's, and Brigadier-General Ripley's. I have omitted to mention, in the proper place, that Major Robert S. Smith and Lieutenant Lewis Cobb, of t of Georgia, flesh wounds in breast and leg. Brig.-Gen. Lawton, in leg. Brig.-Gen. Armistead, in the foot. Brig.-Gen. Ripley, in neck, not dangerously. Brig.-Gen. Ransome, of North-Carolina, slightly. Col. Alfred Cummings, in command
fired in return. With one fire of grape, the whole band of rebels could have been mowed down; but the gallant commanders fled — fled, ay — and when they got to Higginsport, actually hoisted their cannon ashore, and moved off up the river with their boats. Much of our town is destroyed; the loss will reach one hundred thousand dollars. The principal sufferers are Thomas Myers, J. B. Ryan, W. H. Diltz, W. P. Taylor, Mrs. Hooker, S. F. Marshall, V. Weldin, J. T. McKibben, and William Barr. The confederate forces are a battalion of Morgan's. Colonel Bradford, Colonel Harris, and F. L. Cleveland, Esq., are still in the hands of the enemy. On yesterday Colonel Wilson and Colonel Wadsworth, commanding the forces from Maysville and Ripley, pressed on to Brownsville in the effort to overtake the rebels; but were there only in time to fall upon their rear-guard, they having retreated in great haste in the direction of Falmouth. All of which is respectfully submitted, Joseph Donipha