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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 44 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall or search for Stonewall in all documents.

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ome means it appears that this order was construed into one to retire, and accordingly those decimated regiments withdrew from the scene of conflict, while the entire left of our forces retired in good order from the wood, and took a position in the rear. The misfortune of this misunderstanding can scarcely be estimated. One more effort and these regiments, which had forced themselves right up to the enemy's guns, would have gained a splendid triumph. But the opportunity was lost, and Stonewall Jackson again slipped through our fingers, after we had marched through mud and rain for fifteen days to cultivate a more intimate acquaintance with him. Truly, there's many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip. There was more than one who saw our forces come from the woods, but there was one whose eagle eye took in the whole field. How he watched those retiring columns. See, Colonel, said Fremont, they retire in good order. But now no time was to be lost. For four hours our men had been
Capt. Means's Union company, who were fortunately not to be found. Gen. Hill immediately took up his headquarters in the tavern-stand, next to Col. Miles's. Old Stonewall, after riding down to the river, returned to Bolivar Heights, the observed of all observers. He was dressed in the coarsest kind of homespun, seedy and dirty aton on the opposite heights. Night coming on, the struggle ceased, Jackson's forces occupying the deserted intrenchments on the hills of Bolivar. That night old Stonewall sent a message to Gen. Walker that his forces were in possession of the enemy's first line of intrenchments, and that with God's blessing, he would have Harper's come rapidly forward during the night, and were in position on our extreme left. What a strange strength and confidence we all felt in the presence of the man, Stonewall Jackson. Between six and seven o'clock the Federals advanced a large body of skirmishers, and shortly after the main body of the enemy was hurled against the di
s and Archy's brigades, Second Louisiana, and Second and Third Virginia brigades. As soon as the terms of surrender were completed, Gens. A. P. Hill and Jackson rode into town, accompanied by their staff, and followed by a troop of Loudon soldiers, who straightway commenced looking for those d----Loudon guerrillas, referring to Capt. Means's Union company, who were fortunately not to be found. Gen. Hill immediately took up his headquarters in the tavern-stand, next to Col. Miles's. Old Stonewall, after riding down to the river, returned to Bolivar Heights, the observed of all observers. He was dressed in the coarsest kind of homespun, seedy and dirty at that; wore an old hat which any Northern beggar would consider an insult to have offered him, and in his general appearance was in no respect to be distinguished from the mongrel, bare-footed crew who follow his fortunes. I had heard much of the decayed appearance of the rebel soldiers, but such a looking crowd! Ireland in her w
cks of Jackson's men rendered their intrenchments on Bolivar Heights too warm for the enemy, and late in the evening they fell back to Camp Hill, one mile in the rear of the Bolivar fortifications. Here they had their heavy guns planted and strong intrenchments thrown up, but within easy range of the batteries of McLaws and Anderson on the opposite heights. Night coming on, the struggle ceased, Jackson's forces occupying the deserted intrenchments on the hills of Bolivar. That night old Stonewall sent a message to Gen. Walker that his forces were in possession of the enemy's first line of intrenchments, and that with God's blessing, he would have Harper's Ferry and the Federal forces early next morning. At daylight the next morning, (Monday,) the fight was renewed, the enemy still offering an obstinate resistance, until about seven o'clock A. M., when their colors were struck and a capitulation proposed. Of the terms of this capitulation we have learned no particulars, but conc
September 17, 1862. With the first break of daylight the heavy pounding of the enemy's guns on their right announced the battle begun, and for an hour the sullen booming was uninterrupted by aught save their own echoes. McClellan had initiated the attack. Jackson and Lawton, (commanding Ewell's division,) always in time, had come rapidly forward during the night, and were in position on our extreme left. What a strange strength and confidence we all felt in the presence of the man, Stonewall Jackson. Between six and seven o'clock the Federals advanced a large body of skirmishers, and shortly after the main body of the enemy was hurled against the division of Gen. Lawton. The fire now became fearful and incessant. What were at first distinct notes, clear and consecutive, merged into a tumultuous chorus that made the earth tremble. The discharge of musketry sounded upon the ear like the rolling of a thousand distant drums, and ever and anon the peculiar yells of our boys tol