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rom Middletown, under an order received by me from Major-Gen. Reno, directing me to support with my division the advance of Gen. Pleasanton, who, with his brigade of cavalry and artillery, was moving up the Hagerstown turnpike, toward the positions of the enemy in the pass of South-Mountain. The First brigade of the division, Colonel E. P. Scammon commanding, consisting of the Twelfth, Twenty-third, and Thirtieth Ohio regiments, and McMullin's Ohio battery, was ordered to proceed by the Boonsboro road, running to the left of the Hagerstown turnpike, and to feel the enemy, ascertaining whether the crest of South-Mountain on that side was held by any considerable force. The Second brigade, Colonel Crook commanding, consisting of the Eleventh, Twenty-eighth, and Thirty-sixth Ohio regiments, and Simmons's battery, with Schambeck's cavalry troop, was ordered to follow on the same road, to support the First brigade. It soon became evident the enemy held the crest in considerable forc
rom Middletown, under an order received by me from Major-Gen. Reno, directing me to support with my division the advance of Gen. Pleasanton, who, with his brigade of cavalry and artillery, was moving up the Hagerstown turnpike, toward the positions of the enemy in the pass of South-Mountain. The First brigade of the division, Colonel E. P. Scammon commanding, consisting of the Twelfth, Twenty-third, and Thirtieth Ohio regiments, and McMullin's Ohio battery, was ordered to proceed by the Boonsboro road, running to the left of the Hagerstown turnpike, and to feel the enemy, ascertaining whether the crest of South-Mountain on that side was held by any considerable force. The Second brigade, Colonel Crook commanding, consisting of the Eleventh, Twenty-eighth, and Thirty-sixth Ohio regiments, and Simmons's battery, with Schambeck's cavalry troop, was ordered to follow on the same road, to support the First brigade. It soon became evident the enemy held the crest in considerable forc