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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 33 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 19 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 14 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Blackland (Mississippi, United States) or search for Blackland (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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every woods for the enemy for miles around. On the fourth of June, the brigade, supported by Powell's battery, made a forced reconnoissance, and encountered a strong body of rebel cavalry, infantry, and artillery, a short distance this side of Blackland, with whom they had a successful skirmish, the Second Iowa losing three killed and nine wounded, and the Second Michigan two killed and seven wounded. Again, on the sixth, it made another reconnoissance in the direction of Baldwin, skirmishing driving the enemy that distance to Twenty-Mile Creek, in the bottom of which lay a large body of rebel infantry. On the ninth the brigade, temporarily in command of Colonel Sheridan, was directed to proceed the shortest possible road from near Blackland to Baldwin. It did so, and arrived at the latter point on the following morning at four o'clock, finding the enemy gone. Lieut.-Col. Hatch was then ordered with a battalion each of the Second Michigan and Second Iowa, to proceed toward Guntow
nce in the burning cars, fired by Colonel Elliott at Booneville, that he pronounced it to be at Corinth, and that he violently swore at a report that reached him, that the explosions were at Booneville. That he sent all over town to ascertain the author of the rumor, and while engaged in this search a messenger arrived direct from Booneville confirming the report that the Yankees were there. Whereat, Beauregard altered his route and galloped away immediately, taking the roundabout way of Blackland to Baldwin. This statement was made in the presence of several officers, and was entirely voluntary and unasked for. Colonel Elliott arrived at Booneville on the thirtieth of May, at two o'clock A. M. He remained secreted in the woods east of the railroad until daylight, when he moved down upon the town, and was met by a body of about two hundred rebel cavalry, who incontinently fled at a volley from Captain Campbell's Second Michigan revolving rifles. This was the only resistance Col