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to thirty thousand men, for four hours, then fell back in good order. Gen. Paine and Gen. Palmer both conducted the affair with credit to themselves, and their men behaved admirably. Our men were greatly in hopes that the enemy would push on toward our camp over the creek, where the main force was silently awaiting their approach. But, perhaps, thinking they had seen enough of glory, they wisely concluded not to carry out their boast (as told us by deserters) of driving us into the Tennessee River. Knowing we were at Farmington the night before, they evidently expected to flank us and cut us off from the main army, and get up a little private fight à la Shiloh. But Gen. Pope's headquarters is not ten miles from camp, and faithful sentinels are far enough in advance to allow us to coolly get ready in line of battle, and then take a good lunch before they arrive, which is slightly different from shooting down men with trowsers in one hand and musket unloaded in the other. (If
more dangerous swamps and ambuscades of their southern forests. Their whole country from Richmond to Memphis and Nashville to Mobile rung with their taunts and boastings, as to how they would immolate the Yankees if they dared to leave the Tennessee River. They boldly and defiantly challenged us to meet them at Corinth. We accepted the challenge and came slowly and without attempt at concealment to the very ground of their selection; and they have fled away. We yesterday marched unopposed rn were encamped, the destruction of baggage and stores was very great, showing precipitate flight. Portions of the army were immediately put in pursuit, but the results are not yet generally known. Gen. Pope is in advance, and has crossed Tennessee River. Gen. Thomas's army moved by way of Farmington, and is to-day encamped in Price and Van Dorn's late positions. It seems that it was the slow and careful approach of Gen. Halleck which caused the retreat. They would doubtless have remaine
ountains, arriving before Chattanooga on the seventh, after a long and tedious march. After a short rest, in accordance with your order, my command was thrown forward to reconnoitre in ford. We found the enemy on the opposite side of the Tennessee River well intrenched behind earthworks close to the river-bank and on the top of the hill, preparing to dispute our crossing the river at this point. The artillery under the command of Lieutenant Sypher, First Ohio, and Lieut. Nell, First Kentssionism. Trimble was subsequently sent to Gen. Mitchel, at Huntsville. Passing through Winchester, Gen. Negley encamped his forces at a place called Cowan, on the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, and on a branch of a tributary of the Tennessee River. The trestle-work of the railroad bridge at this point was found to have been burned by the rebels, but the stream was easily fordable, and it was crossed on Wednesday morning, June fourth, and the line of march resumed toward Jasper, Mario
n while our brigade (O.) remained in bivouac near Corinth, while preparations were evidently afoot for placing our army on an active campaign footing. Transportation and baggage was reduced, our supply of tents cut down, etc., so as to facilitate our progress through the country, when a move should become necessary. This period proved not to be far distant, for about the same time, General Rosecrans became aware that Price had occupied Iuka in force, and was endeavoring to cross the Tennessee River, for the purpose of getting in the rear of Buell, in his movement against Bragg. In conjunction with Gen. Grant, he therefore prepared to bag the Diarrhoetic General. It was decided upon that a column of eighteen thousand men under Generals Grant and Ord, should move via Burnsville, and attack Price, while General Rosecrans would move with part of his corps via Jacinto, and attack the enemy on the flank, while the balance of his column would move on the Fulton road, and cut off his (P
n while our brigade (O.) remained in bivouac near Corinth, while preparations were evidently afoot for placing our army on an active campaign footing. Transportation and baggage was reduced, our supply of tents cut down, etc., so as to facilitate our progress through the country, when a move should become necessary. This period proved not to be far distant, for about the same time, General Rosecrans became aware that Price had occupied Iuka in force, and was endeavoring to cross the Tennessee River, for the purpose of getting in the rear of Buell, in his movement against Bragg. In conjunction with Gen. Grant, he therefore prepared to bag the Diarrhoetic General. It was decided upon that a column of eighteen thousand men under Generals Grant and Ord, should move via Burnsville, and attack Price, while General Rosecrans would move with part of his corps via Jacinto, and attack the enemy on the flank, while the balance of his column would move on the Fulton road, and cut off his (P
Col. Sill received his supplies by way of Stevenson. His wagons, in passing from the latter place to Jasper, were compelled to cross Battle Creek, near its mouth, upon a pontoon-bridge, and then to skirt for some distance the right bank of the Tennessee. The rebels, well understanding the nature of the country, planted a battery of two twelve-pounders upon the left bank of the river, opposite Battle Creek, in such a way that they could completely command the road along which the wagons going ire upon our men as they were commencing to cross the creek. Edgarton immediately put two of his pieces in position to reply, and at the same time companies A and B of the Second Ohio regiment were deployed as skirmishers along the bank of the Tennessee. The firing was kept up in quite a lively style for some time, until a shell from Edgarton's battery struck plump upon one of the enemy's pieces, and placed it hors du combat. The rebels immediately abandoned both their cannon, and betook th
for picket and reconnoitring on that side of the town. In the next five or six days I hope to be in the possession of much information regarding the batteries, their approaches, and the forces in support. Respectfully, your obed't servant, T. Williams, Brigadier-General Volunteers Commanding. P. S.--Lieutenant Elliott's Brigade Quartermaster goes down for supplies, and can furnish details not given here. headquarters Second brigade, below Vicksburgh, July 6, 1862. Captain: The Tennessee left here last evening with the mail, but hearing the beating of drums at Grand Gulf, proceeded no further, and returned this evening for an additional gunboat to protect her in passing that point. Her return enabled me to supply an omission in my report of the fourth instant. It is that the eight long-ranged rifled guns of Nims's and Everett's batteries, from their position behind the levee at Burney's Point, distant seven eighths of a mile from the enemy's nearest battery on the uppe