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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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alry, ten Parrott guns, and one battery of six-pounders, smooth-bore cannon. To this should be added the Tenth Maine regiment of infantry, and five companies of Maryland cavalry, stationed at Winchester, which were engaged in the action. The loss of the enemy was treble that of ours in killed and wounded. In prisoners ours greariver, the water coming nearly over the horses' backs in the deepest of it, and running quite rapidly too. In this manner your correspondent made his escape into Maryland, and to the nearest telegraph station and post-office. The operator at Martinsburgh had left the town on the first rumor of a battle at Winchester, and taken e ferryboat was soon arranged for the heavy train. I think there never was a more thankful company of human beings than those of us who stood upon the shores of Maryland last night. To-day, at five o'clock, nearly all the train had crossed. Gen. Banks and staff came in about noon. I have been several hours among the wounded.
rt Sumter, which cut off the hope of immediate conciliation. Immediately afterwards all the roads and avenues to this city were obstructed, and the capital was put into the condition of a siege. The mails in every direction were stopped and the lines of telegraph cut off by the insurgents, and military and naval forces which had been called out by the Government for the defence of Washington were prevented from reaching the city by organized and combined treasonable resistance in the State of Maryland. There was no adequate and effective organization for the public defence. Congress had indefinitely adjourned. There was no time to convene them. It became necessary for me to choose whether, using only the existing means, agencies, and processes which Congress had provided, I should let the Government fall into ruin, or whether, availing myself of the broader powers conferred by the Constitution in cases of insurrection, I would make an effort to save it, with all its blessings, f
and wagons, joined the column on its route thither. Hab we got Richmon‘ yet, boss? asked a darkey in a corn-field, turning up his eyeballs in admiration of the Maryland cavalry; well, if we ain't, we soon shall, for McClellan and our boys is sure to fotch him. Others, however, proved keener-sighted than the negro: women ran to hey say. Now arid then an old man is met by the wayside, pensive and sad, but recognizing the horsemen, he stops, looks astonished, and throws up his hat for the Maryland cavalry, just arrived. Others wave handkerchiefs--'tis useless to deceive them, for a woman instinctively discovers friends or foes at sight. Our cavalry here!lellan's wonderful genius as a commander, and the speedy subjugation of the rebels. Our wearied horsemen called for refreshments, which the sutler handed to the Maryland cavalry (!) with great alacrity; but when pay was demanded our troopers roared with laughter, told the proprietor who they were, and much to his surprise and ind
how to perform this duty; but it will be necessary to notify the military commander of the point watched, and the persons agreeing to watch it, so he may know when a proper person brings information. You need not fear making yourself any more liable to depredations by thus acting, for your all is gone if your soldiers are conquered. Every foot of ground in Mississippi should be disputed; every stump should form a rifle-rest, and canebrake a camp. You are not like Missouri, Kentucky and Maryland. No craven cowards have invited the vandals on to your soil; no regiments calling themselves Mississippians are marching with the Northmen-your brothers are not in their ranks. They are really and truly invaders, and should be met with resistance in every shape and manner, and death should meet them at every step. Let them see that this is your determination. Let them feel that their advance will be bloody, and their retreat bootless, and you will then be safe. Remove your cotton fro
is another call: Refugees from the State of Maryland and the District of Columbia: You are resome days previously, to drive the enemy from Maryland. That night he established his headquarters d orders to repel the enemy invading the State of Maryland, marched only six miles per day, on an ahode Island cavalry, three hundred and fifty; Maryland cavalry, two hundred; McGrath's artillery comtime, it was known that the enemy had entered Maryland, and Colonel Miles began to strengthen his pohey opened a furious fire simultaneously from Maryland, Loudon Heights, and Sandy Hook, with howitze New-York, Twelfth Illinois, Rhode Island and Maryland. They left at nine o'clock, crossing to MaryMaryland on the pontoon-bridge. Rebel pickets fired on them as they passed by. The artillery taken cand resulted in driving the rebel troops from Maryland soil. After returning to Frederick an alarime our troops first encountered the enemy in Maryland until he was driven back into Virginia, we ca[7 more...]
nts appeared in the Richmond papers: save Richmond.--I will be one of one hundred to the gunboat to join any party, officered by determined and resolute officers, to board the whole fleet of gunboats and take them at all hazards, to save this beautiful city from destruction. I am not a resident of this State, but of the confederate States, and if such a scheme can be got up, my name can be had by applying to this office. Corinth. Here is another call: Refugees from the State of Maryland and the District of Columbia: You are requested to meet this morning, at eleven o'clock, at the rooms of the Maryland Society, Pearl street, over the store of Weston and Williams. A tender of our services for the defence of Richmond is the object. of the meeting. The call is made with the approval of many friends, and signed by myself at their request, as an assurance of its authenticity. Walter Lenox. And here another: notice.--All young men out of the army who are f
some days previously, to drive the enemy from Maryland. That night he established his headquarters tained none. With ten axes belonging to some Maryland troops, hiring all that could be obtained, a d orders to repel the enemy invading the State of Maryland, marched only six miles per day, on an aOur first rumors of the enemy's crossing into Maryland near Noland's Ferry, at the mouth of the Monohode Island cavalry, three hundred and fifty; Maryland cavalry, two hundred; McGrath's artillery comtime, it was known that the enemy had entered Maryland, and Colonel Miles began to strengthen his pohey opened a furious fire simultaneously from Maryland, Loudon Heights, and Sandy Hook, with howitzehalf has elapsed since the enemy crossed into Maryland, evidently with the design of capturing this New-York, Twelfth Illinois, Rhode Island and Maryland. They left at nine o'clock, crossing to MaryMaryland on the pontoon-bridge. Rebel pickets fired on them as they passed by. The artillery taken c
In Walker's division we had five killed, three of these by the accidental explosion of a shell. Among the killed in this division, we have heard the name of Lieut. Robertson, of French's battery. later.--Since the above was written we have received the following additional particulars, contained in a letter to Gov. Letcher from Col. Francis H. Smith: Winchester, September 16. After the advance of our army to Frederick, and the issuing of the admirable proclamation to the people of Maryland by Lee, a movement took place with our troops, seemingly in the direction of Pennsylvania, but really for an important movement into Virginia. After sending a portion of his troops to occupy and hold the Maryland Heights, Gen. Jackson was directed by Gen. Lee to recross the Potomac at Williamsport, take possession of Martinsburgh, and then pass rapidly behind Harper's Ferry, that a capture might be effected of the garrison known to be there. The movement was admirably conducted. Martinsb
Doc. 122.-battle of Antietam, Md. further reports of this battle will be found in the Supplement. Despatch from General Hooker. Centreville, Md., Wednesday, September 17. A great battlhe next six days crowned the efforts of our army, and resulted in driving the rebel troops from Maryland soil. After returning to Frederick an alarm of fire was given, and it was discovered that therefore, that the rebel army lost at least 30,000 of their best troops during their campaign in Maryland. From the time our troops first encountered the enemy in Maryland until he was driven back iMaryland until he was driven back into Virginia, we captured thirteen guns, seven caissons, nine limbers, two field-forges, two caisson-bodies, thirty-nine colors and one signal-flag. We have not lost a single gun or color. On the barmy in the several conflicts which terminated in the expulsion of the enemy from the loyal State of Maryland, are creditable alike to the troops and to the officers who commanded them. A grateful
near at hand, and to that end the people of the United States are desirous to aid promptly in furnishing all reinforcements that you may deem needful to sustain our Government. Israel Washburne, Jr., Governor of Maine. N. S. Berry, Governor of New-Hampshire. Frederick Holbrook, Governor of Vermont. Wm. A. Buckingham, Governor of Connecticut. E. D. Morgan, Governor of New-York. Chas. S. Olden, Governor of New-Jersey. A. G. Curtin, Governor of Pennsylvania. A. W. Bradford, Governor of Maryland. F. H. Pierpont, Governor of Virginia. Austin Blair, Governor of Michigan. J. B. Temple, President Military Board of Kentucky. Andrew Johnson, Governor of Tennessee. H. R. Gamble, Governor of Missouri. O. P. Morton, Governor of Indiana. David Tod, Governor of Ohio. Alexander Ramsey, Governor of Minnesota. Richard Yates, Governor of Illinois. Edward Salomon, Governor of Wisconsin. The President's reply. Executive mansion, Washington, July 1, 1862. gentlemen: Fully concu
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