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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 5 document sections:

She was the armed despatch and transportation steamer attached to the Engineer Department at Charleston under Brig.--Gen. Ripley, whose barge a short time since was brought out to the blockading flege down Beaufort River, arriving here at ten last night. On board the steamer when she left Charleston were eight men, five women, and three children. I shall continue to employ Robert as a pilo-Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Commander Parrott's report. U. S. Steamer Augusta, off Charleston, May 13, 1862. sir: I have the honor to inform you that the rebel armed steamer Planter was brought out to us this morning from Charleston by eight contrabands, and delivered up to the squadron. Five colored women and three children are also on board. She carries one thirty-two-pounder anend her to Port Royal at once, in order to take advantage of the present good weather. I send Charleston papers of the twelfth, and the very intelligent contraband who was in charge will give you the
rigadier-General Stevens. hazard Stevens, Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. Charleston Mercury account. Charleston, June 18, 1862. Secessionville is a small village, the summer retreat of a few of the James Island planters. It is nts were held in reserve to support the five engaged, and to protect their retreat. Richmond Dispatch account. Charleston, June 20, 1862. The late battle in the vicinity of this city was a far more brilliant and important affair than at fl campaign,) is in command. This man Stevens professed to be an ardent pro-slavery man before the war, and was here in Charleston, enjoying its hospitalities, only two years ago. There is much dissatisfaction here with the military authorities of, and a strong wish expressed for a change in the commanding officers. The South-Carolina troops are anxious to defend Charleston, and will do so successfully if they are permitted to. A report that we were to have the great services of Beauregard s
s cheerless. That night we met reenforcements. Before morning the army was strengthened. Pray God it was made strong enough to go to Richmond. People, you may still rely on Gen. McClellan, until further displays of capacity. His retreat was masterly. He carried all that army and all his trains successfully through one narrow road, while encompassed by enemies two-fold as strong as his army. W. D. B. A confederate narrative. this account was published in a pamphlet at Charleston, South-Carolina. The bloody checks which the Northern army, in its memorable advance up the Peninsula towards Richmond, had received at Williamsburgh and the Seven Pines, had taught Gen. McClellan the desperate character of the conflict, without which he could never hope to reach in triumph the capital of the confederate States. Accordingly, after the battle of the Seven Pines, his movements became exceedingly circumspect, and, although his army already largely outnumbered that which defen
Doc. 84.-a rebel soldier's Diary of the enemy's approach to and withdrawal from before Charleston, S. C., May, June and July, 1862. May 17.--Enemy sounding Stono Channel in barges. One fired on from Goat Island by riflemen, and driven off. May 19.--Several of the enemy's gunboats attempted to enter Stono Inlet; one ran aground and all put back. May 20.--Three gunboats crossed the Bar and entered the Stono River about three o'clock A. M. One ran up and anchored a little below Batterant batteries of Col. T. G. Lamar and of Capt.----Warley, in the direction of Secessionville, rendered the enemy's advance across the causeway, though repeatedly threatened, too perilous for him to attempt. Brig.-Gen. H. W. Mercer arrived from Charleston in the afternoon. Col. Johnson Hagood, First regiment South-Carolina volunteers, previously detained in the city by his duties as Provost-Marshal, joined his regiment during the day. Casualties light. Brig.-Gen. Gist and aids, covered with sa
Lake Superior to the mouth of the Mississippi, including Key West and the Tortugas. The remaining sixty thousand men I would station on the line of the railroad from Memphis, Tenn., to Chattanooga, and from thence on one railroad branch to Charleston, S. C., and on one other branch to Richmond, Va.; occupying between Memphis and Chattanooga important intermediate points, say Grand Junction, Corinth, Decatur, and Stevenson. Between Chattanooga and Charleston I would occupy, say, Dalton, AtlaCharleston I would occupy, say, Dalton, Atlanta, Union Point, Augusta, Branchville, and, possibly, Columbia, S. C. Between Chattanooga and Richmond 1 would occupy, say, Knoxville, Abington, Wytheville, Lynchburgh, Charlottesville, Burksville; and Richmond and Fredericksburgh should also be occupied. Just as soon as the points indicated are recovered from the enemy they should permanently be occupied by a military force. The important strategic points, such as Chattanooga, Memphis, and Richmond, should be strongly fortified without