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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 205 205 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 134 124 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 114 4 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 102 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 98 14 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 97 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 83 39 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 79 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 67 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for New Bern (North Carolina, United States) or search for New Bern (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 7 document sections:

ce Butler. Bowed down with grievous cares of state, (For things weren't going very straight,) There sat that awful potentate King Jeff, the great secesher; He looked exceedingly forlorn, Harassed and vexed, annoyed and worn; 'Twas plain his office didn't return Much profit or much pleasure. Says Jeff (he thus soliloquized:) ”This isn't quite as I surmised; It really cannot be disguised, The thing is getting risky: Winchester, Donelson, Roanoke, Pea Ridge, Port Royal, Burnside's stroke At Newbern — by the Lord, I choke!” Jeff took a drink of whisky. “McClellan, too, and Yankee Foote; Grant, Hunter, Halleck, Farragut, With that accurst Fremont to boot;” (Right here he burst out swearing; And then, half-mad and three parts drunk, Down on his shaking knees he sunk, And prayed like any frightened monk, To ease his blank despairing.) He prayed: ”O mighty Lucifer! Than whom of all that are or were There is no spirit worthier To be our lord and master; O thou Original Secesh! Pleas
Wilmington, N. C., March 28.--It seems that the Lincolnites at Newbern, having made themselves at home in Mr. Bennington's office, and free with his property, are now publishing the Progress semi-weekly. Our pickets have captured some of the Yankee pickets, and have thus obtained a sight of the precious document. It must be consoling for Mr. Pennington and Mr. Vestal to be coolly informed, by means of the types and paper and other materials justly be longing to the former, that the present editor (whose name a friend who saw the affair does not recollect) has totally changed the politics of the paper; that the former editor was a vile secessionist, and other things more numerous than complimentary, whereas the present one was all sorts of a fellow. The editor announces that as soon as he can get some decent paper from New-York, he will publish the Progress daily; but with what he has now, he must confine himself to a semi-weekly. It is hard enough to rob a man of his money w
T. H. Squire, Surgeon Eighty-ninth N. Y. V., in a private letter from Roanoke Island, thus mentions a most affecting incident: The daughter of Dr. Cutler, Twenty-first Massachusetts, of whom I have spoken in a previous letter, died a few days ago at Newbern, of typhoid fever. Her remains were brought back to this island and buried to-day. Who will write her epitaph in befitting verse? She was the friend of the sick and wounded soldier; educated, accomplished, young, beautiful, affectionate, patriotic, pious, self-sacrificing. In her death in the van of the army, a woman pure and lovely has been laid as a victim upon the altar of Liberty. She died away from home; a father whom she loved stood by her, but his duties to the wounded prevented him from accompanying her remains to their temporary resting-place on this beautiful island. Sacred be the spot where her remains now lie! Ye winds that whisper in the pines, breathe her a requiem! Ye grapes and mistletoe that climb
several reported instances of heroic devotion on the part of chaplains. They are not exceptional instances. We doubt not that a weekly record longer than this, and as conspicuous, could be presented, if we only could know the facts of the life of our chaplains: At the battle of Roanoke Island, the Rev. Mr. James, of Worcester, Mass., when the officers were shot down around a gun, sprang forward, encouraged the men, and worked in the midst of them as a gunner. The Rev. John L. Lenhart, the chaplain of the Cumberland, remained at his post with the surgeons among the wounded, and went down with his ship, nobly dying at the post of duty. Brother Lenhart was a Methodist minister, and had been in the navy since 1847. He was greatly beloved by the officers and crew of the Cumberland. The Rev. Orlando N. Benton, Chaplain of the New-York Fifty-first, fell at the battle of the Neuse, near Newbern. He was a Presbyterian pastor at Apalachin, Tioga County, N. Y.--New-York Examiner.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Feeling among the North-Carolina troops. (search)
Feeling among the North-Carolina troops. A private letter, found in the intrenchments at Newbern, N. C., after the flight of the rebels, lets more light than these productions usually do upon the state of feeling in the rebel camps. The document is dated, Camp lee, Newbern, craven County, N. C., March 10, and the writer says: We have got the Raleigh Register here, and it says the Northern and Southern Congresses are both trying for peace, and that Col. Charles C. Lee has orders not Newbern, craven County, N. C., March 10, and the writer says: We have got the Raleigh Register here, and it says the Northern and Southern Congresses are both trying for peace, and that Col. Charles C. Lee has orders not to pay any more fifty dollar bounty to regulars until further orders. I also heard a man belonging to the cavalry say yesterday, that he believed by the first of July, two thirds of the Southern people would be back in the Union, and peace would be made. There are plenty of Yankees here. We have two bridges to guard, and they have both been set on fire, but the guard discovered it in time to prevent damage. Seven Yankees were arrested near here, yesterday, and several others were taken t
April 1.--At Charleston, South-Carolina, the fall of Newbern created the greatest consternation. The fire-eaters ridiculed the North-Carolina troops, charging them with cowardice. The shopkeepers and bakers of Charleston also refused to receive North-Carolina money, and there being two North-Carolina regiments there at the time, a revolt was the consequence, and the shops were broken open and the troops helped themselves. These regiments refused to serve any longer, and were allowed to return home.--Baltimore American, April 2.
A Yankee Millwright.--Captain Arnold, of company E, Rhode Island Fourth regiment, after the battle of the fourteenth, was ordered to take possession of the cross-roads at Havelock station. Near this place he came upon a large and valuable property, in the shape of a corn and flour-mill, combined with a sawmill, belonging to Dr. Master, of Newbern. He found the place deserted, and the machinery purposely thrown out of gear to prevent its use by the Yankees. The turbine wheel had wedges and clogs placed in it, so that it would be both difficult and dangerous to attempt to start the mill. Being a practical mechanic, and withal possessing some experience in the management of mills, Captain Arnold immediately discovered what was the matter with the mill. He drew down the pond, came to the seat of the difficulty, repaired damages, and in a few hours the mill was jogging along as good as new, doing good service in the cause of the Union by grinding corn-meal for the use of the troop