hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 718 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 564 12 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 458 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 458 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 376 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 306 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 280 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 279 23 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 237 5 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 216 6 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fitz Lee or search for Fitz Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 2 document sections:

found six separate commands under Generals Early, Jones, Fitz Lee, Imnboden, Jackson, Echols, and McCouslin, arranged in a n running order again. We did that work in six hours; while Lee, with his army of seventy-five thousand men, had the control They smiled also. When Averill was opposite Staunton, Fitz Lee was at Fry Depot, on the Virginia Central Railroad, a daycurrence, indeed. Every body thought Averill was treed now. Lee was ordered across the Blue Ridge. He passed through Brown' night. Still, there was plenty of time to cut Averill off. Lee and Imboden marched day and night to Lexington, and then towim. Here was committed the fatal and foolish blunder. While Lee and Imboden were on the road to Covington, in striking dista would have marched on, caught and killed the Yankees. What Lee thought, this writer don't know. They who know, say Imboden was penned up. McCausland, Echols, and Jackson at one gate; Lee and Imboden at the other. Some ass suggested he might escap
st returned from a ten days raid behind the enemy's lines. Our force consisted of a portion of Fitz Lee's cavalry division, under General Chambliss, and Rosser's brigade, under General Rosser--all under the command of Fitz Lee. Fitz Lee's division had already been reduced by his pertinacious but ineffectual efforts to capture Averill, to but a moiety of his proper number; while Rosser's brigadFitz Lee's division had already been reduced by his pertinacious but ineffectual efforts to capture Averill, to but a moiety of his proper number; while Rosser's brigade had just achieved a successful tour around Meade's army, and, as a matter of course, was greatly diminished. We started with about one thousand one hundred men in all. It was raining when we starterost-bitten and frozen, fell out of ranks, and stopped at the farm-houses, waiting for a thaw. Fitz Lee, however, pushed on, after recruiting a day at Moorfield, in Hardy County, Virginia. Fordingort and took to the woods. We succeeded, however, in capturing fifteen or twenty of them. General Lee then sent his cattle and disabled men toward Romney, and with the rest of his command, now re