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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Roderick Prentiss or search for Roderick Prentiss in all documents.

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neer. Commander J. H. strong, Commanding U. S. S. Monongahela. U. S. S. Monongahela, Mobile Bay, Aug. 10, 1864. sir: The following persons, wounded in the action of the fifth instant, were sent to the Naval Hospital at Pensacola. Lieutenant R. Prentiss, both legs, left one amputated. Michael Smith, boy, scalp. Wm. Feeney, private marine, contusions. I am, respectfully, David Kindleberger, Surgeon U. S. Navy. Commander James A. strong, Commanding U. S. S. Monongahela. Repor the U. S. S. Monongahela. United States steamer Monongahela, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. sir: The following are the casualties on board this ship, resulting from the action to-day with Forts Morgan and Gaines and the rebel rams: Roderick Prentiss, Lieutenant, both legs badly injured by splinters, left one amputated; Michael Smith, boy, severe lacerated wound of scalp by splinters; William Feeney, Paymaster, contusion of back and left arm, slight; Holbert Lane, Surgeon's Steward, wou
fifteen wagons. After several skirmishes with the enemy, General Blunt descended Arkansas River, and on the first of September occupied Fort Smith, Arkansas. The main body of our troops in the Department of the Missouri had, in the early part of the season, been sent to reenforce General Grant before Vicksburgh. Taking advantage of this reduction of force, the enemy moved against Helena and attacked that place on the fourth of July. After a severe engagement he was defeated by Major-General Prentiss, with a heavy loss in killed and wounded, and one thousand one hundred prisoners. Our loss, in killed, wounded, and missing, was only about two hundred and fifty. As soon as Vicksburgh had capitulated, Major-General Steele was sent with a force to Helena, with instructions to form a junction with Brigadier-General Davidson, who was moving south from Missouri by Crowley's Ridge, and drive the enemy south of Arkansas River. The junction being effected, General Steele established his
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Passage of the falls by the fleet. (search)
ssistant Inspector-General. Lieutenant-Colonel W. B. Kinsey, One Hundred and Sixty-first New-York volunteers. Lieutenant-Colonel Hubbard, Thirtieth Maine volunteers. Major Sawtelle, Provost-Marshal, and Lieutenant Williamson, Ordnance Officer. The following were a portion of the regiments employed: Twenty-ninth Maine, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Emmerson; One Hundred and Sixteenth New-York, commanded by Colonel George M. Love; One Hundred and Sixty-first New-York, commanded by Captain Prentiss; One Hundred and Thirty-third New-York, commanded by Colonel Currie. The engineer regiment and officers of the Thirteenth army corps were also employed. I feel that I have done but feeble justice to the work or the persons engaged in it. Being severely indisposed, I feel myself unable to go into further details. I trust some future historian will treat this matter as it deserves to be treated, because it is a subject in which the whole country should feel an interest, and the nob