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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 662 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 188 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 174 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 148 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) or search for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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hile waiting reenforcements from General Grant, moved up the Arkansas River to Arkansas Post, which place was, with the assistance of the gunboats, captured on the elne hundred and eighty-two wounded, and seven hundred and fifty-six missing; at Arkansas Post, one hundred and twenty-nine killed, five hundred and thirty-one wounded,f the Missouri. The withdrawal to Missouri of a large part of our forces in Arkansas, as was stated in my last annual report, left the frontier of the former exposvalry, and on the tenth September our troops took possession of the capital of Arkansas. Our loss in killed, wounded, and missing did not exceed one hundred. We cptness. These were to be replaced by reenforcements from Steele's corps, in Arkansas, which also formed a part of Grant's army Hearing nothing from General Grannd Tennessee, and portions of Alabama and Mississippi, and the greater part of Arkansas and Louisiana, and restored the free navigation of the Mississippi River. H
osition of Jackson next fell into their temporary possession. Our unsuccessful assault on the post at Helena was followed, at a later period, by the invasion of Arkansas; and the retreat of our army from Little Rock gave to the enemy the control of the important valley in which it is situated. The resolute spirit of the peopleectations confidently entertained at the commencement of the campaign, his further progress has been checked. If we are forced to regret losses in Tennessee and Arkansas, we are not without ground for congratulations on successes in Louisiana and Texas. On the sea-coast he is exhausted by vain efforts to capture our ports; whileable the Congress to levy internal taxation at its succeeding session. These laws were passed in May, and the States of Virginia, North-Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas, having joined the Confederacy, the Congress adjourned to meet in the city of Richmond in the following month of July. Prior to the assembling of your predece
ates Congress to aid the rebellion; all who resigned commissions in the army or navy of the United States, and afterward aided the rebellion; and all who have engaged in any way in treating colored persons, or white persons in charge of such, otherwise than lawfully as prisoners of war, and which persons may have been found in the United States service as soldiers, seamen, or in any other capacity. And I do further proclaim, declare, and make known, that whenever, in any of the States of Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South-Carolina, and North-Carolina, a number of persons not less than one tenth in number of the votes cast in such State at the Presidential election of the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty, each having taken the oath aforesaid and not having since violated it, and being a qualified voter by the election law of the State existing immediately before the so-called act of secession, and excluding all ot
Doc. 40.-restoration of Arkansas. Proceedings of a public meeting in Helena, January 2, 1864. in pursuance of public notice, a large and enthusiastic meeting, and also to take such steps as might be deemed advisable to restore the State of Arkansas to its former peace and prosperity in the Federal Union. Brigadier-Genoke as follows: General Buford's speech. My Fellow-Citizens of the State of Arkansas: I have learned from your own words that the majority of your legal vobanner with its united galaxy of thirty-four stars, among which that one named Arkansas shone with an effulgence as bright and as pure as any in the blue field of thetake his seat in the United States Senate as one of the Senators from the State of Arkansas. Resolved, That the State of Arkansas now is, and was in May, 1861, whState of Arkansas now is, and was in May, 1861, when the ordinance of secession was passed, a member of the United States of America. Resolved,That we recognize as valid no power or authority which attempts to se
Doc. 55.-re-organization of Arkansas. The following are the instructions of President Lincoln to General Steele in reference to the reorganization of Arkansas: Executive mansion, Washington, Jan. 20, 1864. Major-General Steele: Sundry Arkansas: Executive mansion, Washington, Jan. 20, 1864. Major-General Steele: Sundry citizens of the State of Arkansas petition me that an election may be held in that State, at which to elect a Governor; that it be assumed at that election, and thenceforward, that the Constitution and laws of the State, as before the rebellion, are State of Arkansas petition me that an election may be held in that State, at which to elect a Governor; that it be assumed at that election, and thenceforward, that the Constitution and laws of the State, as before the rebellion, are in full force, except that the Constitution is so modified as to declare that there shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except in the punishment of crimes, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted; that the General Assembly mbe by you severally administered, to support the Constitution of the United States and modified Constitution of the State of Arkansas, and be declared by you qualified and empowered to immediately enter upon the duties of the offices to which they s
e. Lieutenant-Colonel McCaleb, mounted on a large gray horse, was a mark for all the enemy's sharp-shooters, but as cool as on parade, he directed the movements of his men. This is the first action the Second Mississippi artillery has been in, the regiment only being mustered on the twentieth of January; but veterans could not have acted better, and the only trouble the officers had was to keep the men back. It is useless to speak of the Thirtieth Missouri; the bloody fields of Chickasaw, Arkansas Post, and Vicksburgh are their guarantees. If the Twenty-ninth Illinois was not in the fight, it certainly was not their fault, for men never showed more eagerness to be engaged. Strange as it may seem, incredible as it appears to those who witnessed the rapid and incessant firing, not a man on our side was touched. The enemy lost six killed, ten wounded in our hands, and eight prisoners, and how many wounded were taken off in their ambulances it is impossible to say. A negro at w
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 99.-the fire and blood of Revolution. (search)
icultural people ever was rich. The wealth of Philadelphia alone is equal to the entire wealth of the State of Virginia. Take the Post-Office alone. The total receipts from the post-offices in Virginia for 1857-58, were $242,951; the expenditures were $453,848. In South-Carolina, the receipts were $101,145; the expenditures were $248,600. In Alabama, the receipts were $111,092; the expenditures were $248,750. In Mississippi, the receipts were $88,458; the expenditures were $332,508. In Arkansas, the receipts were $385,727; the expenditures were $244,589. How is this deficiency made up now? Part of it is made up thus: The receipts in the State of New-York are $1,438,711; the expenditures are $1,154,141. In Massachusetts, the receipts are $565,633; the expenditures are $425,237. In most of the Northern States there is a deficit. But in all the Southern States the deficit is enormous. The whole Northern deficit is some $800,000. The whole Southern deficit is some $3,000,000. Su
g Mississippi Squadron. Surgeon Mixer's account. Surgeon Mixer was attached to the Lexington. United States steamer Lexington, off Trinity, Ouachita River, March 2, 1864. . . . . . . . . The Admiral came down on the afternoon of the twenty-ninth of February, and, true to my prediction, he has furnished us with something to do. We are on an expedition up the Ouachita. (Pronounce that Washitaw.) There are six vessels in the fleet, carrying seventy guns. The Ouachita rises in Arkansas, and empties into the Red, about forty-five miles from the mouth of the latter. The last sixty miles of the course of the Ouachita is sometimes called the Black River. We started at noon on the first of March, and during the first day met no opposition. To-day we were also unopposed, until within four miles of our present position, when about one hundred men, concealed behind a levee, opened on us with musketry. The fire was replied to by the fleet, and we kept on our course until we
Doc. 125.-fight near cotton plant, Ark. Missouri Democrat account. Duvall's Bluff, Ark., camp Eighth Missouri cavalry volunteers, April 25, 1064. on the morning of April twentieth, detachments of companies A, B, C, E, F, H, I, L, and M of this regiment, about two hundred and fifty men, left this place under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J. W. Lisenby, and arrived at Cotton Plant at ten o'clock next morning. Here we learned that two hundred guerrillas had left the town the day before. We resumed the march at eleven o'clock, and at dark halted and sent a small party to reconnoitre. Sergeant Major was informed that the rebs knew our designs, and had formed in line on both sides of the road. Upon this we marched back a mile; and cooked, as we had scarcely eaten the day before. The next morning, at day-break, the rebs commenced a vigorous attack on our pickets. We mounted, formed, and rode out to meet the enemy. Company E, commanded by Captain William J. Bodenhamer, (a
Doc. 128.-battle of Fitzhugh's woods, Ark. Report of Major Foster. headquarters Third Minnesota Volunteer infantry, little Rock, Ark., April 3, 1864. Captain John Peetz, Post-Adjutant, Little Rock: Captain: I have the honor to report the part which the detachment of the Third Minnesota volunteers, under my command, took in the recent expedition and action up White River, under command of Colonel C. C. Andrews, of the Third Minnesota. I received orders from Colonel Andrews at halt. Paul, April 16. In conversation with Captain Devereux, of the Third regiment, who has just returned from Little Rock, Arkansas, we were favored with the following particulars of the recent fight at Fitzhugh's Woods, near Augusta, in North-Eastern Arkansas. On Wednesday, the thirtieth ultimo, the Third regiment was on duty at Little Rock, in Arkansas. At five P. M. it received orders from Colonel (now General) Andrews, commanding the post, to be prepared to march in one hour. At halfpas
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