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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 182 6 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 80 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 79 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 76 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 62 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 48 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Ulric Dahlgren or search for Ulric Dahlgren in all documents.

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hel that the force left there to defend it had withdrawn, and the enemy were in possession of the Gap, having with them two pieces of artillery. Instructing Captain Dahlgren of Gen. Sigel's staff, whose presence as a volunteer should have been noticed, to hurry forward the artillery, Gen. Stahel dashed on for the Gap. True enoug the General and his men followed them, driving then down the mountain and back upon their artillery, which, fortunately, had not reached the Gap. Meanwhile Captain Dahlgren had been hastening on with the artillery. As they entered the rough road through the gap at a full gallop, one of the caissons was broken in halves. Fortun positions; energy in not allowing any rest to his opponents; unquestioned courage in leading wherever danger threatened. General Stahel was ably seconded by Capt. Dahlgren, Col. Wyndham, and Lieut.-Colonel Sackett, and generally by his soldiers. The expedition lost not more than twelve in killed and wounded. They captured near
f possible, reach the Charleston and Savannah Railroad and destroy it at that point, and the bridge on it over the Coosahatchie. I was fully instructed, however, not to hazard too much in order to accomplish the above, but if opposed by a force at all superior, to fall back under cover of the fleet. There was some delay in starting, arising from the gunboats being well to the rear, which I improved in borrowing from Commander Steedman, on board the flag-ship Paul Jones, a twelve-pound Dahlgren boat-howitzer, and fifty-two rounds of ammunition, which proved of great service to me, and for which I desire to return my thanks. I was also furnished by Gen. Brannan's order with fifty men from the New-York State Volunteer En gineers, under command of Capt. Eaton, provided with the necessary implements for cutting the railroad, etc. We were soon under way, and had proceeded some three miles up the river, when the gunboats turned around and came back, in compliance, as I am informed,
Doc. 31.-Dahlgren's reconnoissance into Fredericksburgh, Va., Nov. 9. headquarters Eleventh ect, General, your most obedient servant, Ulric Dahlgren, Captain and Aid-de-Camp. Carleton's of the First Indiana cavalry, commanded by Capt. Dahlgren. I am sitting in Col. Asboth's tent, atgel selected his body-guard, commanded by Captain Dahlgren, with sixty men of the First Indiana cavandred men all told. The tide ebbed and Captain Dahlgren left his hiding-place with the Indianians The rebel cavalry were in every street. Captain Dahlgren resolved to fall upon them like a thunderd. Having cleared the main thoroughfare, Captain Dahlgren swept through a cross-street upon anotherpetuous charge drove them back again, and Captain Dahlgren gathered the fruits of the victory, thirtng. Stuart has his compeers — Pleasanton and Dahlgren. We are beginning to learn war. We have had e Northern soldier is beginning to be felt. We shall hear more from Captain Dahlgren and his men.
rce far outnumbering the one commanded by Major Knox. The resistance offered was trifling, and as a consequence but little damage was done on either side. Capt. Dahlgren, of Gen. Sigel's staff, who had volunteered for the expedition, was sent with a detachment to Salem--ten miles--but found no enemy. Returning in advance of hnd finding such a course would not save his corn, finally declared that several of his horses had the black tongue, and had been eating from the corn. Oh! says Dahlgren, all of our animals have that disease — so there is no risk to run. Mr. Secesh then became alarmed, and begged to be let off because he feared his horses might Leesburgh, and crossing Goose Creek, after a long and fatiguing march, arrived in chantilly the same night. Just before Gen. Stahel crossed the shenandoah, Captain Dahlgren, of Gen. Sigel's staff, with twenty-five men, was sent off to the right from Middleburgh. He went to Mount Gilead, Circleville, Goose Creek Church, and the
Passaic, (monitor,) Commander Percival Drayton, senior officer in command, carrying one fifteen-inch and one eleven-inch Dahlgren. The Patapsco, (monitor,) Commander Daniel Ammen, one fifteen-inch Dahlgren and one two hundred pound Parrott. TheDahlgren and one two hundred pound Parrott. The Montauk, (monitor,) Commander John L Worden, one fifteen-inch and one eleven-inch Dahlgren, which was held as a reserve. The Nahant, (monitor,) Commander Downs, one fifteen-inch and one eleven-inch Dahlgren. The Peira, Capt. Torbox, and two otDahlgren, which was held as a reserve. The Nahant, (monitor,) Commander Downs, one fifteen-inch and one eleven-inch Dahlgren. The Peira, Capt. Torbox, and two other thirteen-inch mortar-schooners. During the night all had been active preparation on the various vessels of the fleet, and all were visited by Commander Drayton and pronounced by their several commanders as fully prepared for action. At seven Dahlgren. The Peira, Capt. Torbox, and two other thirteen-inch mortar-schooners. During the night all had been active preparation on the various vessels of the fleet, and all were visited by Commander Drayton and pronounced by their several commanders as fully prepared for action. At seven o'clock the whole fleet hove anchor and moved up in line of battle toward the Fort, which is about three miles up the river from the point of anchorage. The approach to the Fort is through a long double bend in the river, and immediately around a po
and destruction among the enemy. Of course we did not have every thing our own way; for the enemy poured in his shot and shell as thick as hail. Over, ahead, astern, all around us flew the death-dealing missiles, the hissing, screaming, whistling, shricking, and howling of which rivalled Pandemonium. It must not be supposed, however, that because our broadside-guns were the tools we principally worked that our bow and stern-chasers were idle. We soon opened with our bow eighty-pounder Dahlgren, which was followed up not long after by the guns astern, giving evidence to the fact that we had passed some of the batteries. While seated on the fish-davit, on the top-gallant forecastle — the Hartford and the Richmond blazing away at the time — a most fearful wail arose from the river, first on our port-bow then on the beam. A man was evidently overboard, probably from the Hartford or the Genesee, then just ahead. The cry was: Help, oh! Help! Help, oh! Help! Man overboard, call
I have already given an account of the loss of the gunboat Diana, and transports Newsboy, Gossamer, and Era No. 2, near Franklin, on Monday. The next day, about sundown, the Hart (iron-clad) was towed across the Teche, two miles below New-Iberia, scuttled and fired. She was not yet completed. She promised to be one of the most formidable, when finished, that the South have built. She was clad with railroad iron dovetailed together. Her armament was very heavy. A rifled thirty-pounder Dahlgren on her bow and a large brass gun on the stern, with their carriages, are perfect, and will be saved. The Hart, as the rebels intended she should be, proved a very serious obstruction, and when I left (three days after) she still lay as she sunk. So rapid did our army follow up the enemy that they had no time to get their transports at New-Iberia away, and the Blue Hammock, Darby, Louise, Uncle Tommy, and Cricket were all either fired or sunk. All the commissary stores and ammunition wi