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was mainly achieved by our cavalry division, our infantry force remaining near Lamar. The information we obtained may be briefly summed up. On November second, Gen. Mansfield Lovell, in command at Coldwater, fell back through Holly Springs. Gen. Pemberton coming up from the capital of Mississippi, on the fifth, stopped him, and ordered that Coldwater should be again occupied. Since then Lovell has been there with his division; and also Tilghman, with a division composed chiefly of exchanged p militia, or conscripts. This constitutes all the rebel force in this vicinity at the date of this letter, though others may be crossing at Vicksburgh, thanks to those who permit crossing to be done at that point. Three weeks ago Gen. Armstrong left Holly Springs with seven thousand men on his way to Port Hudson, a point above Baton Rouge, which is being strongly fortified. He has since resigned. Van Dorn is now at Holly Springs under arrest, and is succeeded, as you know, by Pemberton.
espatch) should be branded with the capital letters T. M. and enrolled in a detached company, to be known by the name of The turreted monster, henceforth and forever. We employ the conditional tense because, as the reader will perceive by General Pemberton's telegram of a later date, some doubt yet exists as to the true story. General Pemberton does not precisely contradict the original statement relative to the turreted panic, but indicates that the guns did not fall into the enemy's hands, detached company, to be known by the name of The turreted monster, henceforth and forever. We employ the conditional tense because, as the reader will perceive by General Pemberton's telegram of a later date, some doubt yet exists as to the true story. General Pemberton does not precisely contradict the original statement relative to the turreted panic, but indicates that the guns did not fall into the enemy's hands, because one of them bursted, and the vessel itself is sunken in the river.
a charge upon a battery of four guns, a short distance from the scene of the first capture, and in one gallant dash took it, and every man belonging to it. The rebels made a desperate effort to recapture those batteries, but did not succeed. Our men, when subsequently compelled to fall back on the left, spiked all the guns which they could not get away. From statements made by prisoners and citizens, I think a just estimate of the rebel force will place the figures at thirty thousand. Pemberton was in the field in person. The confederate troops were from Georgia, South-Carolina, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Missouri. Bowen's command, which we whipped at Port Gibson, was there. A large portion of it was captured, among them fifty men and a captain from Gates's regiment of dismounted cavalry. The rebels concentrated three fourths of their men upon three divisions of our army, those of Logan, Hovey, and Quinby, so that they had really about seven thousand men mor