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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 50 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 49 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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gangway and came within view of the assembled throng, he was welcomed with hearty and long continued cheers. At the appointed hour, the exercises were opened with prayer by Rev. Dr. Smith, pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church. the oration.--Colonel Richard Yeadon (attired in the full uniform of the Wellington Rangers) then delivered an oration, of which the following is a synopsis: He congratulated them on the completion of the first iron-clad ram built for the defence of Charleston Harbor — The Palmetto State. The name was one redolent of victory; and this noble craft, constructed, as she had been, under the direction of the distinguished hero of the Koszta exploit, and commanded by the lineal descendant of the illustrious Governor and dictator of South-Carolina, John Rutledge, would, he trusted, prove herself not unworthy of that glorious name. He then recounted the stirring story of the twenty-eighth of June, ‘76, and showed how hard-won was the unequal fight which
revious. The crew rendered every assistance in getting her off. Lieut. Conroy then piloted the Anglia out of Bull's Bay and over the bar. The Anglia, when captured, was almost out of coal, and was sent by Capt. Godon, senior officer off Charleston harbor, to be supplied. She is the same vessel which attempted on the night of the nineteenth of September last, to enter Charleston harbor by Sanford's channel, but was headed off, though she succeeded in escaping in the darkness. I shall desCharleston harbor by Sanford's channel, but was headed off, though she succeeded in escaping in the darkness. I shall despatch both these steamers North as soon as possible. Before closing this despatch, I cannot forbear calling the attention of the department to the energy and activity displayed by Acting Lieut. Conroy, of the Restless. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, S. F. Du Pont, Rear-Admiral, Commanding S. A. Blockading Squadron. Lieutenant Commanding Conroy's report. on board bark Restless, off Bull's Bay, near Charleston, October 29, 1862. On Friday morning last, at daylight,
r Augusta. P. G. Watmough, Commanding United States Steamer Memphis. C. J. Van Alstine, Commanding United States Steamer Stettin. headquarters one hundred and Seventy-Sixth Regt., Pennsylvania militia, St. Helena Island, S. C., February 21, 1863. sir: Having seen a proclamation issued by Gen. Beauregard and Commodore Ingraham, to the effect that upon the morning of the thirty-first ult., they had, by force of arms, succeeded in dispersing the blockading fleet which was lying off Charleston harbor, and also a statement purporting to have come from the English Consul at that port, and the commanding officer of the English man-of-war Petrel, that they had gone out to a point five miles beyond the usual anchorage of the blockading fleet, and that not a single vessel could be seen, even with the aid of powerful glasses, and that consequently the blockade had been most effectually raised; and knowing, as we do, the above statement to be utterly false in every particular, we feel cons
of Fort Sumter, April 7, 1863. off Charleston harbor, on board flag-ship New Ironsides, Wedne, 1863. The sun has just gone down in Charleston harbor on what it is surely on straining of terand the works that flank the entrance to Charleston harbor, and that it has withdrawn from the conthole fleet was not left at the bottom of Charleston harbor, will be disposed to assert that the trihat over half-way between Port Royal and Charleston harbor, and forms a safe and convenient entrepoof April by the chime. We are lying off Charleston harbor. The sea smooth as a surface of burnishion is founded. Viewed strategically, Charleston harbor forms a cul de suc, four miles in length up than Stono Inlet, a dozen miles from Charleston harbor, where it was to effect a landing on Foleast which our yesterday's experience in Charleston harbor authorizes us to draw. It is that the ter, Major-General. flag-ship Ironsides, Charleston harbor, S. C., April 8, 1863. General: I am [1 more...]