hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 84 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 52 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 44 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 22 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 22 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 22 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Champion's Hill (Mississippi, United States) or search for Champion's Hill (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Doc. 192.-battle of Champion Hill, Miss. Colonel Spicely's report. headquarters Twenty-Fourth Indiana Vols., Champion Hill, Miss., May 17, 1863. Captain Jos. H. Linsey, Acting Assistant AdjChampion Hill, Miss., May 17, 1863. Captain Jos. H. Linsey, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, First Brigade. sir: In pursuance to orders, I have the honor to report the part taken by the Twenty-fourth regiment Indiana volunteers, in the battle of Champion Hill, Mississippi, oChampion Hill, Mississippi, on the sixteenth day of May, 1863. On the sixteenth instant, at six o'clock A. M., we moved from our camp near Bolton's Depot, four miles from the distant battle-ground, in the direction of Edwards'ls, we were apprised by our cavalry advance that the enemy were posted in force in front, on Champion Hill. General McGinnis then ordered me to form my line of battle on the right of the road leadinnd in less than an hour the enemy gave way, leaving our gallant troops in full possession of Champion Hill. But amid our rejoicing over this great victory, we are called upon to mourn the gallant
Doc. 193.-battle of Black River, Miss. bridge across Big Black, May 17, 1863. The battle of Big Black bridge was fought on Sunday, the seventeenth, the (lay after the battle of Champion's Hill. In this spirited engagement only the Thirteenth army corps was engaged. It is superfluous to add that the troops comprising this corps fought as they always do, excellently well. In the morning, after a night's bivouac on the hill overlooking the village of Edwards's Station, the column, with McClernand at its head, moved toward Black River bridge. The citizens who were questioned on the subject said the position was most strongly fortified at the crossing, and we naturally thought the enemy would make stubborn resistance there. We were! not surprised, therefore, to learn that our advance-guard was fired upon by the rebel pickets as the column moved toward the river. The country between Edwards's Station and the bridge loses that hilly and broken character which distinguishe
nemy next day, it captured the town of Port Gibson, and drove the enemy from the north bank of Bayou Pierre; thence marching toward Edward's Station, on the Vicksburgh and Jackson Railroad, it encountered and drove back the enemy from one of the crossings of Fourteen Mile Creek, on the same day that General Sherman drove him back from the crossing at Turkey Creek, and McPherson beat him near Raymond. Soon after it led the advance to Bolton on the railroad, and again against the enemy at Champion Hill, first attacking him and achieving a signal victory, with the assistance of McPherson's corps. That my corps bore the brunt here is attested by the conspicuous part borne by General Hovey, and the greater loss sustained by his division. Rapidly pursuing the routed enemy, we captured many prisoners, together with Edwards's Station, and all of the enemy's stores there, during the evening and night of the same day. By eight o'clock the next morning we overtook the enemy in considerable fo
cPherson, a third remaining at Raymond, and a fourth at Old Auburn, to bring up the army trains. On the fifteenth you again led the advance toward Edwards's Station, which once more became the objective point. Expelling the enemy's picket from Bolton the same day, you seized and held that important position. On the sixteenth you led the advance, in three columns, upon three roads against Edwards's Station. Meeting the enemy on the way in strong force, you heavily engaged him near Champion Hill, and after a sanguinary and obstinate battle, with the assistance of General McPherson's corps, beat and routed him, taking many prisoners and small arms, and several pieces of cannon. Continuing to lead the advance, you rapidly pursued the enemy to Edwards's Station, capturing that place, a large quantity of public stores, and many prisoners and small arms. Night only stopped you. At day-dawn, on the seventeenth, you resumed the advance, and early coming upon the enemy strongly i