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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 58 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 37 3 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 28 28 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 24 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 17 17 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 15 9 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 13 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Franklin (Tennessee, United States) or search for Franklin (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 4 document sections:

battle at Thompson's Station, Tenn. Lieutenant Bachman's report. headquarters First brigade, Third division, Franklin, Tenn., March 8, 1863. Lazarus Noble, Adjutant General State of Indiana: I have the honor to submit the following briefthe command of Colonel Jordan of the Ninth Pennsylvania, and the Eighteenth Ohio battery. The column marched out of Franklin, Tenn., about ten o'clock A. M., upon the Columbia pike, and when about three miles out the advance-guard came upon the picoburn and the brave men of his command in the late unfortunate affair at Thompson's Station, eight miles south of Franklin, Tennessee, to publish the following statement of facts, obtained on the spot. Wednesday, the fourth of March, the brigade uthat our men fought gallantly. Yours, etc., John McCrea. Lieutenant-Colonel Bloodgood's letter. camp at Franklin, Tenn., March 5. my dear brother: Long before you receive this, you will probably hear of our disastrous battle. So far
Doc. 147.-the surrender at Brentwood. Cincinnati commercial account. Franklin, Tenn., March 28, 1863. the cavalry engagement between our forces, under General Green Clay Smith, and the rebels under Cols. Stearns and Wheeler and Gen. Forrest, near Franklin, Tenn., deserved more than a passing notice. Considering the disparity of the numbers on each side, and the complete success of our forces, it was one of the most brilliant affairs of the war. Early on the morning of the twenty-Franklin, Tenn., deserved more than a passing notice. Considering the disparity of the numbers on each side, and the complete success of our forces, it was one of the most brilliant affairs of the war. Early on the morning of the twenty-fifth, information was received by Gen. Granger that a large rebel cavalry force had crossed Little Harpeth, about six miles from camp, with the evident purpose of attacking Brentwood, a station on the railroad, about nile miles from Franklin. Gen. Smith was ordered to take a force of cavalry and find out the location of the enemy and his intentions. With parts of the Ninth Pennsylvania, Sixth Kentucky, Fourth Kentucky, and Second Michigan cavalry, numbering five hundred and forty-five men in
bravery. Daniel Lakin, seaman; John Williams, seaman; John Breese, Boatswain's Mate; Alfred Peterson, seaman. All on board Commodore Perry, in attack upon Franklin, N. C., October third, 1862, and distinguished themselves by their gallant conduct. Thomas C. Barton, seaman on board Hunchback, in attack upon Franklin, N. C. MeFranklin, N. C. Mentioned for heroic conduct. Edwin Smith, ordinary seaman on board Whitehead, in attack upon Franklin, N. C., October third, 1862. Swam ashore under the fire of the enemy with a line,and thus rendered important service. Mentioned for gallantry. Daniel Harrington, landsman, on board Pocahontas. Landing in a boat near BrunswicFranklin, N. C., October third, 1862. Swam ashore under the fire of the enemy with a line,and thus rendered important service. Mentioned for gallantry. Daniel Harrington, landsman, on board Pocahontas. Landing in a boat near Brunswick, (Ga.,) March eleventh, 1862, and when fired upon by the enemy, concealed, exhibited great coolness and bravery. John Williams, captain maintop, on board Pawnee, in attack upon Mathias Point, June twenty-sixth, 1861. Gallantry cannot be spoken of in too high terms. Though wounded by a musket-ball in the thigh, he retained cha
Doc. 160.-the fight at Franklin, Tenn. Despatch of General Rosecrans. Murfreesboro, Tenn., April 11, 1863. Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief: the following despatch was received from General Granger on the tenth instant: Van Djor-General. W. S. Rosecrans, Major-General. Captain Matchett's report. camp of the Fortieth O. V.I., near Franklin, Tenn., April 11, 1863. Colonel S. D. Atkins, Commanding Second Brigade, Third Division, Army of Kentucky: Colonel: I ha863. Official list of killed, wounded, and missing of the Fortieth Ohio volunteer infantry, in the engagement at Franklin, Tenn., April tenth, 1863: killed--Orderly Sergeant Wilson Burrows, company A; privates Washington Link and Thomas Huntiubbard, company A; Adam Suverly, Wallace Bennett, and Michael Madigan, company C. Nashville Union account. Franklin, Tennessee, April 11, 1863. We have been so much accustomed of late to skirmishing, that any serious thought of an attack