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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

Charleston, S. C. July 15.--On Wednesday last the pickets of the Eutaw Battalion entered Legare's, the enemy having — to use their own expressive term--skedaddled the day previous. The first feature meeting the eyes of the advancing confederates was a number of mock sentinels stationed at intervals along the road. The dummies were neatly manufactured out of old clothes, and, with the addition of damaged gun-stocks, looked quite the martial Yankee. They were doubtless posted on the road wnter season in your noble city near Sumter. The following lines of doggerel were scribbled on one of the walls. The runaway writer has some fun in him, and we can almost forgive the hasty manner in which he left our shores without visiting Charleston: twenty-Eighth of June--good-Bye. air--Mary Blane. Oh! farewell, Carolinians, We are going far away; Don't cry — we'll soon be back, Another game to play. Chorus — Oh! farewell! oh! farewell! Our parting's full of pain; But do take <
t also fall a prey To the bold Santiago. Two days went by; “Sail oh!” was heard, We instantly gave chase, Came up with her, and here we had The Mersey for the race. Another schooner hove in sight Upon the thirty-first, And 'twas not long ere those on board The Santiago cursed. But what cared we for rebels' curse, Our cause we knew was just; We're battling in our country's cause, In Providence our trust. While coming slowly down the coast On twenty-seventh of May, When the Lucy Holmes, of Charleston, Was standing in our way, We sent a prize-crew with her to The city of New-York, Where they no doubt her cargo wished For making cotton-work. Though England still may boast her speed In vessels worked by steam, If they think to beat the Yankees, They'll find that they but dream; They built an iron steamer For the rebellious States-- They thought the way was open then, But we had closed the gates. 'Twas August third, and Sunday noon, This steamer came in sight; We put our engine to the te
the table-cloth hanging down, touching the floor. I first looked under the bed, but in vain. As I was about to go away I thought I would look under the table, so I lifted the cloth and discovered a pair of spurs and also a cavalryman attached to them. He lay there so quiet that I could hardly hear him breathe. As soon as I discovered him, I cocked my piece and presented it to his breast, at the same time ordering him to come out. After looking at me for a second, he complied with my order. As we came out of the house, he told me that he was a member of Ashby's cavalry, and had stopped there to get something to eat. He then said: Since you have got me you may as well have my horse. So we walked round to the barn and got his horse, also a sabre and a carbine. We then proceeded to Charleston, at which place our boys had quartered themselves, I delivered my prisoner to General Geary, who after a short examination placed him in charge of the guards. --Cleveland Herald, December 9.
Mobile, Sept. 13.--A special despatch to the Advertiser and Register, dated Charleston, September eleventh, says: It is reported that the people of Baltimore have risen en masse and cleared the city of the Yankee troops, hung the Provost-Marshal, Van Nostrand, and his deputy, McPhailes, and captured a large fort erected on Federal Hill by the Yankees for the destruction of the city in the event of a successful revolt. Stuart's cavalry are spreading consternation among the enemy in Maryland. The foregoing report is fully credited in Richmond.--Grenada Appeal, September 13.
st.--Robert Small, Pilot; Alfred Gridiron, Engineer; Abram Jackson, Jebel Turner, W. C. Thompson, Sam Chishlm, Abram Allerton, Hannah Small, Susan Small, Clara Jones, Anna White, Levina Wilson, David McCloud, 3 small children. Log.--We leave Charleston at 1/2 past 3 o'clock on Tuesday morning. We pass Fort Sumter 1/4 past 4 o'clock. We arrived at blockading squadron at Charleston bar at 1/4 to 6. We give three cheers for the Union flag wonce more. Articles of Sundary.--4 large c, not m Chishlm, Abram Allerton, Hannah Small, Susan Small, Clara Jones, Anna White, Levina Wilson, David McCloud, 3 small children. Log.--We leave Charleston at 1/2 past 3 o'clock on Tuesday morning. We pass Fort Sumter 1/4 past 4 o'clock. We arrived at blockading squadron at Charleston bar at 1/4 to 6. We give three cheers for the Union flag wonce more. Articles of Sundary.--4 large c, not mounted; 2 mortars. We arrive at Port Royal, Hilton, on same night about 9 P. M.--New-York Tribune.
ng in readiness before the attack.--Intelligencer. Hurrah, hurrah, good news and true, Our woes will soon be past; To Charleston, boys, all praise be due, The Devil's caught at last. He's caught, he's dead, and met his fate On Morris Island's sands, His carcass lies in solemn state, The spoil of rebel hands. Hurrah, hurrah, let Dixie cheer! What may not Charleston do! The devil's caught at last, we hear; A Yankee devil, too! The blackest, bluest from below, The prince of all is he, Who leadplough the vernal tides. Like serpents which Minerva sent To crush the Trojan sire, So northern devils come to vent On Charleston blood and fire. But Neptune ne'er decreed the fate Of Laocoon's dear sons, To gratify the Yankees' hate On Charleston'Charleston's dearer ones. They'll never bear one fatal hour, The Northern serpent's coil, Nor feel the Yankee devil's power Who come to crush and spoil. The “Nondescript,” name chosen well; The “Northern devil,” aye! A fiend, a ghoul, a spirit fell! Who may