hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 506 506 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 279 279 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 141 141 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 55 55 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 32 32 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 29 29 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them.. You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 6 document sections:

1861: F. J. Porter's division, consisting of two brigades. A third brigade added Sept. 27. Sept. 12, 1861: Stone's division, consisting of two brigades, Lander's and Peck's. Baker's brigade was added towards the end of the month or early in October. Sept. 14, 1861: Buell's division, consisting of Couch's and Graham's brigades. A third brigade added early in October. Sept. 16, 1861: McCall's division; on the 25th of that month he received the last two regiments of the Pennsylvania ReOctober. Sept. 16, 1861: McCall's division; on the 25th of that month he received the last two regiments of the Pennsylvania Reserves, so that his division consisted of thirteen regiments in three brigades, under Meade, J. F. Reynolds, and Ord. Sept. 28, 1861: W. F. Smith's division, consisting of the Vermont brigade (afterwards Brooks's), J. J. Stevens's and Hancock's brigades. Oct. 5, 1861: Heintzelman's division, consisting of Richardson's, Sedgwick's, and Jameson's brigades. Oct. 11, 1861: Hooker's division, consisting of his own (afterwards Naglee's) brigade and Sickles's brigade. In November a third bri
sy supporting distance; a few days later Smith's division was moved to Marshall's Hill. To support this movement McCall's division was, on the 9th of Oct., brought to the Virginia side to Langley's, and a few days later to Prospect Hill. He was replaced at Tennallytown by a brigade of Buell's division. On the 5th of Oct. Heintzelman's division was formed, and posted at Fort Lyon, south of Alexandria, forming the left of our line on the Virginia side. During the months of September and October Sickles's brigade, posted on the south side of the eastern branch, sent frequent reconnoissances into lower Maryland. Early in November Hooker's division was organized and moved to the vicinity of Budd's Ferry to observe the enemy, who were active in that direction, and to prevent, as far as possible, the crossing of the river by emissaries of the enemy. So that early in November the positions of the command were as follows: On the right McCall's division at Prospect Hill; Smith's di
Chain Bridge, thence to Upton's Hill, and did not get back until after dark. . . . I can't tell you how disgusted I am becoming with these wretched politicians. Oct. .--. . . The enemy made some demonstrations up the river this morning, which prevented me from crossing the river until 1.30; then I rode to Munson's Hill, etcd nearly pulled my arm off. The cheering of the men made him perfectly frantic, and, as I had to keep my cap in my right hand, I had only my left to manage him. Oct. (10?). I have just time to write a very few lines before starting out. Yesterday I threw forward our right some four miles, but the enemy were not accommodatinsomely repulsed with the loss of quite a number of men and one gun. . . . In front of us the enemy remain quiet, with the exception of occasional picket-firing. Oct. .--. . . I am firmly determined to force the issue with Gen. Scott. A very few days will determine whether his policy or mine is to prevail. He is for inacti
ible to follow up the victory; but after the lapse of some months it would have been foolish to advance unless prepared to follow up a victory and enter upon a campaign productive of definite results. Early in Sept., 1861, Gens. W. T. Sherman and G. H. Thomas had been taken from my command and ordered to report to Gen. Robert Anderson, just placed in command of Kentucky. Before many weeks Anderson was relieved, in consequence of failing health, and Sherman succeeded to his duties. In October he became very much depressed and took an exceedingly gloomy view of the situation. He called for 200,000 men — a force entirely out of the power of the government to supply at that time. On the 2d of Nov. he requested me to order Halleck, Buell, Stevens, and some officers of experience to Kentucky, stating that the importance of his department was beyond all estimate. On the 3d, after giving in detail the position of the troops, about 25,000, he says: Our forces are too small to do go
anges in position of troops. The clothing of Sumner arrived in great quantities near the last of Oct., almost too late for issue, as the army was crossing into Virginia. We finally left 50,000 suitsenough; but they were not delivered sufficiently fast, nor in sufficient numbers, until late in October and early in November. I was authorized to buy 2,500 late in October, but the delivery was notOctober, but the delivery was not completed until in November, after we had reached Warrenton. In a letter from Gen. Meigs, written on the 14th of Oct. and addressed to the general-in-chief, it is stated: There have been issued,irmed in the belief that if I had crossed the Potomac below Harper's Ferry in the early part of October, Gen. Lee would have recrossed into Maryland. As above explained, the army was not in condition to move until late in October and in the meantime circumstances had changed. The period had arrived when a sudden and great rise of the Potomac might be looked for at any moment; the season of
Went to Harper's Ferry and found him with half a dozen Western officers. He remains at Harper's Ferry to-night. . . . Oct. 2 A. M. . . . I found the President at Gen. Sumner's headquarters at Harper's Ferry; none of the cabinet were with himtigue anything. It was one of those little flings that I can't get used to when they are not merited. Pleasant Valley, Oct.-- Since about three this morning it has been blowing a perfect gale; several tents blown over, etc. The bishop preached think they are now a very happy family. All of them sent very kind messages to you, which you can consider delivered. Oct., Berlin. We are now near Berlin, and have a much better camp than the last one. My tent is at the bottom of a wooded rof hither! Blind and foolish they have ever been in Washington, and so, I fear, they will continue to the end. Berlin, Oct. .--. . . It will not do for me to visit Washington now. The tone of the telegrams I receive from the authorities is su