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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.21 (search)
nd young, that I would be pleased to associate them with me in the enterprise of relief. They vowed strictest fidelity, obedience to any terms, and utmost devotion; and from among the host of applicants, Major Barttelot, of the 7th Fusiliers, Mr. Jameson, a rich young civilian, Lieutenant Stairs, of the Royal Engineers, Captain Nelson, of Methuen's Horse, Surgeon Parke, of the Army Medical Department, Mr. Jephson, and two or three others, were enrolled as members of the expedition to relieve Eell, Bonny, how are you? Where is the Major? Sick, I suppose? The Major is dead, sir. Dead? Good God! How dead? Fever? No, sir, he was shot. By whom? By the Manyuema — Tippu-Tib's people. Good heavens! Well, where is Jameson? At Stanley Falls. What is he doing there, in the name of goodness? He went to obtain more carriers. Well, where are the others? Gone home invalided, some months ago. These queries, rapidly put and answered as we stood by
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.22 (search)
uld, on the whole, have preferred not to be rescued! The journey from the Ocean to the Nile, and from the Nile to the East Coast, added much to geographical knowledge, and was the complement of Stanley's previous discoveries. But the cost was heavy, and the leader himself emerged with his health seriously impaired by the tremendous strain of those dark months. Most of his younger companions preceded him to the grave. Stanley survived Nelson, Stairs, and Parke, as well as Barttelot and Jameson; but the traces of the journey were upon him to the end, and no doubt they shortened his days. Those days — that is to say, the fourteen years that were left to him after he returned to England in the spring of 1890--were, however, full of activity, and, one may hope, of content. No other great task of exploration and administration was tendered; and perhaps, if offered, it could not have been accepted. But Stanley found plenty of occupation. He wrote, he lectured, and he assisted the
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.25 (search)
es, and ammunition to match, and other gifts, for the right to manage Mashonaland as he saw fit. Now in the concession to Rhodes, Lobengula had reserved no rights to meddle in the territory. Therefore, when, under the plea that his cattle had been stolen by Rhodes's servants, or subjects, the Mashonas, Lobengula marched into Rhodes's territory and slaughtered the Mashonas and took the white man's cattle, besides creating a general scare among the outlying farmers, and the isolated miners,--Jameson, who was acting as Rhodes's steward, sent the subagent Lendy upon the tracks of the high-handed Matabele, hence the war. This little exposition took amazingly, and there was not one dissentient voice. About the Coal-war I was equally frank, and said, in conclusion, that, if I had any money to spare at the present time, it would not be given to men who were determined to be sulky, and who, to spite the coal-owners, preferred to starve, but to those poor, striving people, who, though th
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.27 (search)
ould applaud Lord Salisbury if he sent a fleet up the Dardanelles. To-day, we have news that Dr. Jameson has invaded the Transvaal, with a small force between four hundred and six hundred strong! Ty to drive him back quicker than he went in. It is not so very long ago that I entertained both Jameson and Rhodes here. I never suspected that either of them would have been concerned in such a harJames of Hereford. I was surprised at his saying that there were extenuating circumstances for Jameson's act, but it is evident that his legal acumen is awry. Under no circumstances would we profiton, tyranny, and hypocrisy, with grinding teeth, and do not forget to allude to the mistakes of Jameson, the tactlessness, folly, and unhappy consequences of the Raid; but they are silent as regards ss to regard them as a community of Jewish speculators in mines; and even the failure to assist Jameson in the Raid, etc., etc., has, unfortunately, rather deepened disbelief in their complaints, whi
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
2; takes Stanley home with him, 146; life on his plantation, 146-150. Ingham, Mrs., Annie, death of, 445. Ingham, C. E., death of, 463. International African Association, 334-338. Isangila, 335. James, Lord, of Hereford, 483. Jameson, Dr., his invasion of the Transvaal, 482, 483. Jameson, Mr., 354. Jephson, Mounteney, joins Stanley's expedition for the rescue of Emin, 354; sent by Stanley to search for Emin, 360, 361; a prisoner, 368; Stanley's characterisation of, 382; sufJameson, Mr., 354. Jephson, Mounteney, joins Stanley's expedition for the rescue of Emin, 354; sent by Stanley to search for Emin, 360, 361; a prisoner, 368; Stanley's characterisation of, 382; sufferings of, 387; carries succour to Nelson, 390; accompanies Stanley to Ostend, 434; Stanley in last sickness talks of, 515. Jerusalem, Stanley at, 245. Johnston, General A. S., 185, 199. Journalism, Stanley's career in, 220-250, 291-295. Kennicy, Mr., 89, 91, 101, 102. Khartoum, massacre of Gordon's forces at, 353; how Stanley would have acted at, 537. Kimber, Mr., 469, 470. Kitchen, J. D., 101-106, 121. Kruger, President, Stanley's description of, 489-499; his ultimatum, 503, 5