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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 33 1 Browse Search
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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.17 (search)
, that, though Mirambo and his hordes effectually closed the usual road to Lake Tanganyika, a flank march might be made, sufficiently distant from the disturbed terrle me to strike west, and make another attempt to reach the Arab colony on Lake Tanganyika. I calculated that from two hundred to three hundred miles extra marchingrossed the last valley and climbed up to the summit of the last hill, lo! Lake Tanganyika was distant from us but half a mile! Before such a scene I must halt onther caravan has arrived for him at Ujiji. He resolves to journey back to Lake Tanganyika, and dismiss these obstinate and mutinous followers of his; and, with new hat mighty river Lualaba, which, at a distance of three hundred miles from Lake Tanganyika, flowed parallel with the lake, northward. In body, he was, as he himselfsitions made to him, he agreed. After exploring together the north end of Lake Tanganyika, and disproving the theory that the Lake had any connection with the Alber
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.18 (search)
uld, at least, give some little play to his own imagination. The few lines given to the contest with Mirambo represent months of struggle with a bandit-chief, and with slippery allies. The three-line mention of the joint exploration of Lake Tanganyika stands for four weeks of adventurous voyaging, geographical discovery, and encounters with hostile or thievish natives. Through the whole period Stanley carried an immense and varied responsibility. He was not only commander, and chief of . But, in his Journal, he records that his stage-fright was so extreme he could only begin after three trials. At the request of the Royal Geographical, he had prepared a brief paper, dealing only with the exploration of the north end of Lake Tanganyika. But, unexpectedly, he was called on to give some account of his whole expedition. He told his story, and read his paper. A general discussion followed, turning mainly on certain geographical questions; and, at the end, Stanley was call
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.19 (search)
was one lake, as he maintained it to be; or whether, as asserted by Captain Burton, James McQueen, and other theorists, it consisted of a cluster of lakes. Lake Tanganyika, being a sweet-water lake, must naturally possess an outlet somewhere. It has not been circumnavigated and is therefore unexplored. I will settle that probl numbers as to make it impossible to resist them, we retreated back to Lake Victoria. We then bade adieu to the Waganda, and travelled south until we came to Lake Tanganyika. We launched our boat on that lake, and, circumnavigating it, discovered that there was only a periodical outlet to it. It is, at this present time, steadily itself that it was the Congo. But he resisted the idea. Anything for the Nile, he said, but I will not be made black man's meat for the Congo! I crossed Lake Tanganyika with my expedition, lifted once more my gallant boat on our shoulders, and after a march of nearly two hundred and twenty miles arrived at the superb river on
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.22 (search)
d, if only because the opportunity exists no longer. As a fact, Stanley not only completed, but he also corrected, the chief of all Livingstone's discoveries. The missionary traveller was steadily convinced that the Nile took its rise in Lake Tanganyika; or, rather, that it passed right through that inland sea. Stanley, when he had found the Doctor, and restored the weary old man's spirit and confidence, induced him to join in an exploration trip round the north end of Tanganyika, which prois fiery, sudden deeds were more often the result of a long process of thought than of a rapid inspiration. The New York correspondent of the Times, who knew him well, tells an illustrative story:-- He and his whole party had embarked on Lake Tanganyika, knowing that the banks were peopled, some with friendly, some with hostile tribes. His canoes moved on at a respectful distance from the nearest shore. Sometimes the friendly people came off to sell their boat-loads of vegetables and frui
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.24 (search)
ssess a wife; my own wife,--Dorothy Stanley now, Dorothy Tennant this morning,--daughter of the late Charles Tennant of Cadoxton Lodge, Vale of Neath, Glamorgan, and of 2, Richmond Terrace, Whitehall, London. On the 8th August, after nearly a month at Melchet, we went to Maloja in the Engadine, where we spent a few quiet, happy weeks. Sir Richard Burton and his wife were there. Stanley had last seen him in 1886. Had a visit from Sir Richard F. Burton, one of the discoverers of Lake Tanganyika. He seems much broken in health. Lady Burton, who copies Mary, Queen of Scotland, in her dress, was with him. In the evening, we met again. I proposed he should write his reminiscences. He said he could not do so, because he should have to write of so many people. Be charitable to them, and write only of their best qualities, I said.--I don't care a fig for charity; if I write at all, I must write truthfully, all I know, he replied. He is now engaged in writing a book called Ant
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
eing good-tempered in Africa, 256; in Ugogo, 256; in Unyanyembe, 257, 258; hears of a grey-bearded man, 259; pays heavy tribute to the natives, 259, 260; sees Lake Tanganyika, 261, 262; arrives at Ujiji, 262; finds Livingstone, 263-267; tells why Livingstone did not return of his own accord, 267-272; leaves Ujiji, 273; his observations in Zanzibar, 298, 299; proceeds inland, 299-301; his camp attacked, 302-304; arrives at the Victoria Nyanza, 305; circumnavigates the Victoria Nyanza and Lake Tanganyika, 305-319; traces the Lualaba (Congo), 318-330; aims to introduce civilisation into Africa, 333, 334; his work of opening up the Congo, 335-339; and Ngalyema, 6. Story, Newton, 156, 165, 169, 170, 180, 193. Suez Canal, opening of, 245. Swinburne, A. B., 345. Syra, Island of, 230-236. Talbot, A., 456, 458. Tanganyika, Lake, 261, 262, 318, 319. Tanner, Dr., 468, 469, 473-475. Tasmania, Stanley visits, 434, 437, 438. Tay-pay, 475, 476. Taylor, Commissioner, 227. Teheran