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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.25 (search)
ll, and time flies by so rapidly that I will not be able to read Lugard's book for a few days yet. The First Volume of Lowell's Letters gives us a pretty clear idea of the man. I see in him the type of a literary character, whose nature I have often been made acquainted with in the past, though not in quite so cultured a form as in Lowell. But, with all his culture, learning, and poetry, and though he is so kind-hearted, loving, sympathetic, ready to oblige, he is what I should call in Engon my wanderings; but then a week hence, where shall I be? November 27th, 1893. my dear D.,--I finished Volume Two of Lowell's Letters yesterday. My former opinion needs slight modification, or rather expansion; it was incomplete, as any opinioneply moved me, and I feel convinced there must be gems of thought among his poetical productions. As I closed the books, Lowell's image, though I never saw him, came vividly before me as he sat in Elmwood library, listening to the leafy swirl withou
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
36, 437. Consents to become candidate for Parliament, 439; defeated, 439; his speeches on second candidacy, 440-442; his disgust at electioneering methods, 443, 444; on Beauregard, Lee, and Grant, 445; on Mackinnon and the East African Company, 446-449; on East Anglia and Yarmouth, 450-452; on Norwich, 452; his enjoyment of solitude by the sea, 453; on the Matabele War, 454, 455; on a coal-strike, 455; on W. T. Stead, 455, 456; on the destruction of the slave-trade in Africa, 457, 458; on Lowell's Letters, 458, 459, 461; on A. L. Bruce, 459, 460; on Sir S. W. Baker, 462, 463; goes to the Isle of Wight, 463; at the Hills-Johnes', 464; begins his Autobiography, 465; elected to Parliament, 466, 467; first impressions of the House, 467-472; impressions of the speakers, 472-476; on obstructive tactics, 476, 477; gives his maiden speech, 478-480; on the Venezuelan affair, 482; his love for his son, 483,485, 486; frequently ill from malaria and gastritis, 483-485. Leaves for South Afric