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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 30 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 28 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 24 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Essex or search for Essex in all documents.

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the ironclads — the Cincinnati, the Carondelet, the Essex, and the St. Louis — forming a front rank. Slowly ast hour had passed. Then a 24-pound shot struck the Essex, crashed through her side and penetrated her boiler, vessel from stem to stern with scalding steam. The Essex, wholly disabled, drifted The Unlucky Essex afEssex after Fort Henry Commander W. D. Porter The thousand-ton ironclad Essex received the severest punishment atinto action at Fort Henry was named after the famous Essex which his father commanded in the War of 1812. Fiftef the shots from Fort Henry struck and told upon the Essex, the last one penetrating her armor and piercing herde Commodore in July, 1862. Again in command of the Essex he attempted unsuccessfully to destroy the dread Conm Arkansas at Vicksburg on July 22d. Porter and the Essex then joined Farragut's fleet. His shells helped theto fall with telling effect upon the Cincinnati, the Essex, the Carondelet, and the St. Louis, which were steam
lieved it possible for the gunboats to run the gantlet of the batteries of Island No.10. But Foote thought it impossible, in the face of the mouths of half a hundred cannon that yawned across the channel. He refused to force anyone to so perilous an undertaking, and the commanders of the vessels all agreed A veteran of many river fights The St. Louis was the earliest of the Eads iron-clad gunboats to be completed and is first mentioned in despatches on January 14, 1862, when with the Essex and Tyler she engaged the Confederate batteries at Columbus, Kentucky. The St. Louis, commanded by Lieutenant Leonard Paulding, participated in the capture of Fort Henry, going into action lashed to the Carondelet. She was struck seven times. At Fort Donelson she was Foote's flagship. Island No.10, Fort Pillow, Memphis — at all these places the St. Louis distinguished herself. On October 1, 1862, the St. Louis was renamed the Baron de Kalb. All through the Vicksburg operations the De Kal
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
1862: Lebanon, Ky. Union, 28th Ky., Lebanon Home Guards. Confed., Col. John H. Morgan's Kentucky Cav. Losses: Union 2 killed, 65 prisoners. July 13, 1862: Murfreesboroa, Tenn. Union, 9th Mich., 3d Minn., 4th Ky. Cav., 7th Pa. Cav., 1st Ky. Battery. Confed., Gen. N. B. Forrest's Cav. Losses: Union 33 killed, 62 wounded, 800 missing. Confed. 50 killed, 100 wounded. July 15, 1862: near Vicksburg, Miss. Union, Gunboats Carondelet, Queen of the West, Tyler, and Essex. Confed., Ram Arkansas. Losses: Union 13 killed, 36 wounded. Confed. 5 killed, 9 wounded. July 15, 1862: Fayetteville, Ark. Union, detachments of 2d Wis., 3d Mo., 10th Ill., and Davidson's Battery. Confed., Gen. Rains' command. Losses: Confed. 150 captured. July 17, 1862: Cynthiana, Ky. Union, 18th Ky., 7th Ky. Cav., Cynthiana, Newport, Cincinnati, and Bracken Co. Home Guards (Morgan's Raid). Confed., Morgan's Cav. Losses: Union 17 killed, 34 wounded