hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 44 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall or search for Stonewall in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 8 document sections:

is lost to the world. But we have the portrait of Brady himself three days later in his famous linen duster, as he returned to Washington. His story comes from one who had it from his own lips: He [Brady] had watched the ebb and flow of the battle on that Sunday morning in July, 1861, and seen now the success of the green Federal troops under General McDowell in the field, and now the stubborn defense of the green troops under that General Jackson who thereby earned the sobriquet of Stonewall. At last Johnston, who with Beauregard and Jackson, was a Confederate commander, strengthened by reenforcements, descended upon the rear of the Union troops and drove them into a retreat which rapidly turned to a rout. The plucky photographer was forced along with the rest; and as night fell he lost his way in the thick woods which were not far from the little stream that gave the battle its name. He was clad in the linen duster which was a familiar sight to those who saw him taking h
e shore of the Rappahannock, just before the battle of Chancellorsville. Action, movement, portraiture are shown. We can hear the officer standing in front giving his orders; his figure leaning slightly forward is tense with spoken words of command. The cannoneers, resting or ramming home the charges, are magnificent types of the men who made the Army of the Potomac--the army doomed to suffer, a few days after this picture was taken, its crushing repulse by the famous flanking charge of Stonewall Jackson; yet the army which kept faith and ultimately became invincible in the greatest Civil War of history. Within sixty days after the Chancellorsville defeat the troops engaged won a signal triumph over the self-same opponents at Gettysburg. ‘Tis fifty years since. The words recall the opening sentence of Scott's famous romance, Waverley, and Scott's reference, like my own, had to do with the strenuous years of Civil War. To one examining the unique series of photographs whi
was over, was to spend many years in the service of the country he was now seeking to divide. Most striking of all was Stonewall Jackson, whose brilliant military career was to astonish the world. The Union plan for this fateful July day was thain until the Union forces were joined by Heintzelman with heavy reenforcements and by Sherman with a portion of Here Stonewall Jackson won his name Robinson House, Bull Run.--Stonewall Jackson won his name near this house early in the afternooStonewall Jackson won his name near this house early in the afternoon of July 21st. Meeting General Bee's troops retreating in increasing disorder, he advanced with a battery to the ridge behind the Robinson House and held the position until Bee's troops had rallied in his rear. Look at Jackson standing there like a stone wall! The expression spread to the army and to the world, and that invincible soldier has since been known as Stonewall Jackson. Beauregard and Johnston found it a herculean task to rally the fleeing men and re-form the lines, but they
ondelet--first to run the gantlet at Island no.10 then handed them over to the Government and waited for his pay until after they had won their famous victories down the river. Their first commander was Andrew H. Foote, who was called the Stonewall Jackson of the West. He had won fame in the waters of the Orient and had spent years in the suppression of the slave trade. Like Stonewall Jackson, he was a man of deep religious principles. On the Sunday after the fall of Fort Henry he preaStonewall Jackson, he was a man of deep religious principles. On the Sunday after the fall of Fort Henry he preached a sermon in a church at Cairo. The next year the aged admiral lay sick in New York. His physician dreaded to tell him that his illness would be fatal, but did so. Well, answered the admiral, I am glad to be done with guns and war. We must get to our story. Fort Henry and Fort Donelson had fallen. General Polk had occupied Columbus, Kentucky, a powerful stronghold from which one hundred and fifty cannon pointed over the bluff. But why hold Columbus in its isolation when Henry and Do
tion of his army did not escape the eagle eye of the Confederate general, Joseph E. Johnston, who believed the time had now come to give battle, and perhaps destroy the small portion of the Union forces south of the river. Meanwhile, General Stonewall Jackson, in the Shenandoah, was making threatening movements in the direction of Washington, and McDowell's orders to unite with McClellan were recalled. The roads in and about Richmond radiate from that city like the spokes of a wheel. Oneto complete the bridges and build entrenchments before advancing. This delay gave the Confederates time to reorganize their forces and place them under the new commander, Robert E. Lee, who while McClellan lay inactive effected a junction with Stonewall Jackson. Then during the Seven Days Battles Lee steadily drove McClellan from his position, within four or five miles of Richmond, to a new position on the James River. From this secure and advantageous water base McClellan planned a new line
rs captured in the Shenandoah These two hundred Confederate soldiers captured the day after Stonewall Jackson's victory at Front Royal, were an insignificant reprisal for the damage done to the Fet. Such tactics will win every time, and a small army may thus destroy a large one in detail.--Stonewall Jackson. The main move of the Union army, for 1862, was to be McClellan's advance up the Pwhich was destined in the end to bring the whole campaign to naught. This was the presence of Stonewall Jackson in the Valley of Virginia. The strategic value to the Confederacy of this broad, sh Banks and his forty thousand now on Virginia soil at the foot of the Valley, and Fremont's Stonewall Jackson at Winchester 1862 It is the great good fortune of American hero-lovers that they c began to fear that Jackson's goal was McDowell and McClellan-two Union leaders whose plans Stonewall Jackson foiled In General McClellan's plan for the Peninsula Campaign of 1862, General McDo
t secrecy, Stuart started June 12, 1862, in the direction of Fredericksburg as if to reenforce Stonewall Jackson. The first night he bivouacked in the pine woods of Hanover. No fires were kindled, he prelude to the Seven Days Battles. The following day, June 26th, had been set by General Stonewall Jackson as the date on which he would join Lee, and together they would fall upon the right wiad safely crossed and destroyed the bridge. They had escaped in the nick of time, for at noon Stonewall Jackson opened fire upon Richardson's division and a terrific artillery battle ensued for the the men of the First Maryland Confederate regiment won glory for them-selves and their cause. Stonewall Jackson's corps at the end of a rapid march had arrived in the middle of the afternoon. Afteron of the Fifth Corps, this regiment with marvelous steadiness sustained the fierce assault of Stonewall Jackson's troops at Turkey Hill. Its total loss that day was 231, including six line officers
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
ion, 1st N. J. Cav., 1st Pa. Rifles, 60th Ohio, 8th W. Va. Confed., 1st Md. and 58th Va. Losses: Union 63 missing. Confed. 17 killed, 50 wounded. Confed. Gen. Turner Ashby killed. June 8, 1862: Cross Keys or Union Church, Va. Union, 8th, 39th, 41st, 45th, 54th, and 58th N. Y., 2d, 3d, 5th, and 8th W. Va., 25th, 32d, 55th, 60th, 73d, 75th, and 82d Ohio, 1st and 27th Pa., 1st Ohio Battery. Confed., Winder's, Trimble's, Campbell's, Taylor's brigades, 4 Va. batteries of Stonewall Jackson's command. Losses: Union 125 killed, 500 wounded. Confed. 42 killed, 230 wounded. Confed. Brig.-Gens. Stuart and Elzey wounded. June 9, 1862: Port Republic, Va. Union, 5th, 7th, 29th, and 66th Ohio, 84th and 110th Pa., 7th Ind., 1st W. Va., Batteries E 4th U. S. and A and L 1st Ohio Artil. Confed., Winder's, Campbell's, Fulkerson's, Scott's, Elzey's, Taylor's brigades, 6 Va. batteries. Losses: Union 67 killed, 361 wounded, 574 missing. Confed. 88 kille