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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 260 6 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 124 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 104 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 82 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 78 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 75 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 72 50 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 69 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) or search for Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 25 results in 4 document sections:

rondelet on account of the narrowness of the stream; and later again, the gallant gunboat won laurels at Island No.10, Fort Pillow, Memphis, and Vicksburg. The Flag-ship St. Louis viewed from astern The Louisville — a fighter at port. rivenditional force. Toward noon many of McClernand's men ran short of powder and he was forced to recede from his position. Pillow seems then to have lost his head. He felt that the whole Union army was defeated, and though the road to Nashville was othe inside, and nothing was left to the inmates but surrender or slaughter on the morrow. A council was held by Floyd, Pillow, and Buckner. Buckner, who was a master in the art of warfare, declared that he could not hold his position for half an would escape on two little boats that were to arrive from Nashville in the morning. He passed the command to Pillow, and Pillow, declaring that he too would escape, passed it on to Buckner. Floyd and Pillow with their men made good their escape; so
her officers and men waiting solemnly for the appearance of Commodore A. H. Foote. The Benton had been his flag-ship in the operations around Island No.10 and Fort Pillow; but the wound he had received at Fort Donelson continued to undermine his health until now, supported by Captain Phelps, he feebly made his way on deck to bid in the capture of Fort Henry, going into action lashed to the Carondelet. She was struck seven times. At Fort Donelson she was Foote's flagship. Island No.10, Fort Pillow, Memphis — at all these places the St. Louis distinguished herself. On October 1, 1862, the St. Louis was renamed the Baron de Kalb. All through the Vicksburg gunboat Conestoga the Cairo engaged three forts, capturing the town. On May 10th the Cairo, still commanded by Lieutenant Bryant, participated in the action at Fort Pillow and the river combat with the Confederate River defense fleet. While being rammed the Cincinnati was so injured that she sank. The Mound City also was injured
Fort Pillow and Memphis Henry W. Elson The Confederate Ram General Price --accidentally se heaviest battle was still in the future. Fort Pillow with its frowning cannon lay eighty miles oland No.10, the gunboat fleet turned toward Fort Pillow. About this time General Pope was called wAfter that the Confederate rams returned to Fort Pillow and the half hour's thrilling fight was ove General J. B. Villepigue, the defender of Fort Pillow Boats that brought on the battle river alone. For two weeks the fleet bombarded Fort Pillow at long range. On May 9th, Flag-Officer Footewas seen drifting slowly down the stream to Fort Pillow, and the battle was over. For two or thrate vessels being huddled under the guns of Fort Pillow. On the 4th of June, great clouds of smomonth had had its first taste of warfare at Fort Pillow and now lay at the foot of the bluffs readyVicksburg, Mississippi the evacuation of Fort Pillow and Fort Randolph and the capture of New Or[6 more...]
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
, Miss. Union, Gen. Plummer's Brigade, Army of the Mississippi. Confed., Gen. Ruggles' Division. Losses: Union 16 killed, 148 wounded, 192 missing. Confed. 8 killed, 189 wounded, 110 missing. May 10, 1862: Plum Point, near Fort Pillow, Tenn. Gunboat battle. Union, Gunboats Cincinnati, Carondelet, Benton, Pittsburg, St. Louis, and Mound City. Confed., eight rams of the River Defense Fleet. Ohio soldiers who fought under Garfield for Kentucky The Forty-second Ohio Infsippi passed forever from the control of the Confederacy. General Samuel Ryan Curtis Fort Curtis, Helena, Arkansas 24th S. C., Charleston, S. C., Battalion. Losses: Union 5 wounded. Confed. 17 wounded. June 3-5, 1862: Fort Pillow, Tenn. Evacuation by Confederates and occupation by Union troops commanded by Col. G. A. Fitch. June 5, 1862: Tranter's Creek, N. C. Union, 24th Mass., Co. I 3d N. Y. Cav. Avery's Battery Marine Art. Confed. No record found. Losses: