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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,234 1,234 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 423 423 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 302 302 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 282 282 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 181 181 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 156 156 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 148 148 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 98 98 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 93 93 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 88 88 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for 1864 AD or search for 1864 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 59 results in 15 document sections:

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Introduction Frederick Dent Grant, Major-General, United States Army General Ulysses S. Grant at city Point in 1864, with his wife and son Jesse Upon being appointed lieutenant-general, and having assumed command of all the armies in the field, in March, 1864, General Grant had an interview with President Lincoln, during which interview Mr. Lincoln stated that procrastination on the part of commanders, and the pressure from the people of the North and from Congress, had forced him into issuing his series of military orders, some of which he knew were wrong, and all of which may have been wrong; that all he, the President, wanted, or had ever wanted, was some one who would take the responsibility of action, and would call upon him, as the Executive of the Government, for such supplies as were needed; the President pledging himself to use the full powers of the Government in rendering all assistance possible. General Grant assured the President that he would do the best
's men: Confederate soldiers in Virginia, 1864 The faces of the veterans in this photograph of 1864 reflect more forcibly than volumes of historical essays, the privations and the courage of the rang disturbed the existence of the two armies until the coming of Grant. In the early months of 1864, the Army of the Potomac lay between the Rapidan and the Rappahannock, most of it in the vicinitymond. Never was a quartermaster's corps better organized than that of the Army of the Potomac in 1864. General Rufus Ingalls, Chief Quartermaster, managed his department with the precision of clockwoas not to be. General Humphreys, who was Meade's chief of staff, says in his Virginia campaign of 1864 and 1865 : So far as I know, no great battle ever took place before on such ground. But little oe Bloody angle. McCool's house, within the Bloody angle. The photographs were taken in 1864, shortly after the struggle of Spotsylvania Court House, and show the old dwelling as it was on M
burg, and Hancock had been ordered to make a reconnaissance with a view to attacking and turning the Confederate left. But difficulties stood in the way of Hancock's performance, and before he had accomplished much, Meade directed him to send two of his divisions to assist Warren in making an attack on the Southern lines. The Second Corps started to recross the Po. Before all were over Early made Bloody angle. McCool's house, within the Bloody angle. The photographs were taken in 1864, shortly after the struggle of Spotsylvania Court House, and show the old dwelling as it was on May 12th, when the fighting was at flood tide all round it; and below, the Confederate entrenchments near that blood-drenched spot. At a point in these Confederate lines in advance of the McCool house, the entrenchments had been thrown forward like the salient of a fort, and the wedge-shaped space within them was destined to become renowned as the Bloody angle. The position was defended by the fa
utler's campaign, compares Grant's maneuvers of 1864 to Napoleon's of 1815. While Napoleon advancedaneous movements he had planned to carry out in 1864, General Sherman rode out the eighteen miles frly This is a photograph of Independence Day, 1864. As the sentries and staff officers stand outse of the bridge and the freshly-turned earth in 1864 is given by the upper picture. At this river Jontoon boats as perfected by Union engineers in 1864. A number of these were stealthily set up and n seventy thousand people living in the city in 1864, a large proportion of whom were in some way co move to points of danger, but in the summer of 1864 there were no trained artillerists to man them. Early approached Washington from the north, in 1864, the crack artillery companies, like that repreast time by Confederate armies in the summer of 1864. Early passed through the place on his second ak of day. This picture represents Sheridan in 1864, wearing the same hat that he waved to rally hi[5 more...]
Drewry's bluff impregnable In battery Dantzler--Confederate gun commanding the river after Butler's repulse on land Butler's failed attempt to take Petersburg. Charles Francis Adams, who, as a cavalry officer, served in Butler's campaign, compares Grant's maneuvers of 1864 to Napoleon's of 1815. While Napoleon advanced upon Wellington it was essential that Grouchy should detain Blucher. So Butler was to eliminate Beauregard while Grant struck at Lee. With forty thousand men, he was ordered to land at Bermuda Hundred, seize and hold City Point as a future army base, and advance upon Richmond by way of Petersburg, while Grant meanwhile engaged Lee farther north. Arriving at Broadway Landing, seen in the lower picture, Butler put his army over the Appomattox on pontoons, occupied City Point, May 4th, and advanced within three miles of Petersburg, May 9th. The city might have been easily taken by a vigorous move, but Butler delayed until Beauregard arrived with a
y 5, 1864. On that day, appointed by Grant for the beginning of the simultaneous movements he had planned to carry out in 1864, General Sherman rode out the eighteen miles from Chattanooga to Ringgold with his staff, about half a dozen wagons, and a Thomas' headquarters near Marietta during the fighting of the fourth of July This is a photograph of Independence Day, 1864. As the sentries and staff officers stand outside the sheltered tents, General Thomas, commanding the Army of the Cumberlt guarded the railroad bridge over the Chattahoochee on July 5th. A glimpse of the bridge and the freshly-turned earth in 1864 is given by the upper picture. At this river Johnston made his final effort to hold back Sherman from a direct attack uponest eight miles north of the bridge. The lower picture shows the canvas pontoon boats as perfected by Union engineers in 1864. A number of these were stealthily set up and launched by Sherman's Twenty-third Corps near the mouth of Soap Creek, behi
Institute at Lexington, after Hunter's raid in 1864. The picture shows the blackened walls of the raid through the valley in the early summer of 1864. The V. M. I. meant much to the people of Virn seventy thousand people living in the city in 1864, a large proportion of whom were in some way co Captain A. J. Russell, labeled this picture of 1864: Engines stored in Washington to prevent their move to points of danger, but in the summer of 1864 there were no trained artillerists to man them. the brilliant Valley Campaign of the summer of 1864, which was halted only by the superior forces o Early approached Washington from the north, in 1864, the crack artillery companies, like that repreast time by Confederate armies in the summer of 1864. Early passed through the place on his second ak of day. This picture represents Sheridan in 1864, wearing the same hat that he waved to rally hial of volunteers. This photograph was taken in 1864, on the vinecovered veranda of a Virginia mansi
port Confederate garrison cooking dinner in ruined Sumter--1864 Fort Sumter in 1864. The story of how these photographs in unconquered Sumter were secured is a romance in itself.ined at his post, catching with his lens the ruins of the uncaptured Fort and the untaken city in 1864. How well he made these pictures may be seen on the pages preceding and the lower picture opposiht on the firing-line. Where is Grant? : heavy artillery just arrived before Petersburg--1864. this heavy Federal battery looks straight across the low-lying country to Petersburg. Its spck. Waiting for the march to the sea: Camp of the first Michigan engineers at Atlanta, autumn, 1864. After the capture of Atlanta, says Sherman, all the army, officers and men, seemed to relax mation — federals concentrating at Stevenson before the Nashville battle Early in the winter of 1864, this station in the little Alabama town fairly hummed with the movement of men and horses and su
Charleston, the uncaptured port Confederate garrison cooking dinner in ruined Sumter--1864 Fort Sumter in 1864. The story of how these photographs in unconquered Sumter were secured is a romance in itself. No one, North or South, can escape a thrill at the knowledge that several of them were actually taken in the beleaguered port by George S. Cook, the Confederate photographer. This adventurous spirit was one of the enterprising and daring artists who are now and then fohe photographer, Cook, managed to get his supplies past the Federal army on one side and the Federal blockading fleet on the other. Yet there he remained at his post, catching with his lens the ruins of the uncaptured Fort and the untaken city in 1864. How well he made these pictures may be seen on the pages preceding and the lower picture opposite. They furnish a glimpse into American history that most people — least of all the Confederate veterans themselves — never expected to enjoy. Thos
dner (standing just back of the man with the haversack) thinks that this is Mr. Brady himself. There are fifteen people in this picture whom Lieutenant Gardner, of this battery, recognized after a lapse of forty-six years and can recall by name. There may be more gallant Pennsylvanians who, on studying this photograph, will see themselves and their comrades, surviving and dead, as once they fought on the firing-line. Where is Grant? : heavy artillery just arrived before Petersburg--1864. this heavy Federal battery looks straight across the low-lying country to Petersburg. Its spires show in the distance. The smiling country is now to be a field of blood and suffering. For Grant's Army, unperceived, has swung around from Cold Harbor, and the Confederate cause was lost when Grant crossed the James, declared the Southern General Ewell. It was a mighty and a masterful move, practicable only because of the tremendous advantages the Federals held in the undisputed possessio
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