Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Burnside or search for Burnside in all documents.

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ond the Rappahannock — as he had forced Pope, Burnside and Hooker before him — says George Cary Eggl, where slept thousands that had fought under Burnside and Hooker. Now, once more, the sad cavalcadick, who marched by way of Chancellorsville. Burnside came next, but he was halted to guard the trao was ill. The Federals confronting them were Burnside on the left, Sedgwick and Warren in the centeConfederate breast-works. He was now between Burnside and Wright. At the first approach of dawn this the 23d of May, and, the afternoon before, Burnside, with his Ninth Corps, arrived and took up hitween his adversary and Richmond. Meanwhile, Burnside, followed by Wright, marched on the evening oorgia, and his crossing of the Etowah River. Burnside was ordered forward to Bethel Church and thenon the bank, opposite the Union center, under Burnside, which had not yet crossed the river. The omac was now in three badly separated parts. Burnside could not get over in sufficient strength to [14 more...]<
ick, who marched by way of Chancellorsville. Burnside came next, but he was halted to guard the trao was ill. The Federals confronting them were Burnside on the left, Sedgwick and Warren in the centeConfederate breast-works. He was now between Burnside and Wright. At the first approach of dawn this the 23d of May, and, the afternoon before, Burnside, with his Ninth Corps, arrived and took up hiver roads unknown to them, while the corps of Burnside and Wright were still demonstrating against twith his whole force either attack Wright and Burnside, or, pushing forward by the Telegraph Road, stween his adversary and Richmond. Meanwhile, Burnside, followed by Wright, marched on the evening oorgia, and his crossing of the Etowah River. Burnside was ordered forward to Bethel Church and thenrates wherever found. By the 22d, Wright and Burnside came up and the march proceeded. But the vigomac was now in three badly separated parts. Burnside could not get over in sufficient strength to [1 more...]
the south of the stream of the two wings of the Army of the Potomac. But when the center under Burnside was driven back and severely handled at Ox Ford, Grant immediately detached a brigade each fromk and the Second Corps arrived at Cold Harbor and took position on the left of General Wright. Burnside, with the Ninth Corps, was placed near Bethesda Church on the road to Mechanicsville, while Warhe base of supplies. On the Southern side Ewell's corps, now commanded by General Early, faced Burnside's and Warren's. Longstreet's corps, still under Anderson, was opposite Wright and Smith, while suspension of all further offensive operations. A word remains to be said as to fortunes of Burnside's and Warren's forces, which were on the Federal right. Generals Potter and Willcox of the Ninension arrived. Early fell upon him later in the day but was repulsed. Warren, on the left of Burnside, drove Rodes' division back and repulsed Gordon's brigade, which had attacked him. The commande
idden mine under Elliott's salient, the strong Confederate fortification opposite. The plan of the mine was conceived by Colonel Henry Pleasants and approved by Burnside, whose Ninth Corps, in the assaults of June 17th and 18th, had pushed their advance position to within 130 yards of the Confederate works. Pleasants had been a y, the right one, the men could hear the Confederates working in the fortification above them, trying to locate the mine, of which they had got wind. It was General Burnside's plan that General Edward Ferrero's division of colored troops should head the charge when the mine should be sprung. The black men were kept constantly onyonets about it. The third and final charge was made, about two in the afternoon, and the bloody fight at the crater was ended as the brigade commanders followed Burnside's order to withdraw to the Federal lines. Both of Ledlie's brigade commanders were captured in the crater. The total Federal loss in this disastrous affair was
idden mine under Elliott's salient, the strong Confederate fortification opposite. The plan of the mine was conceived by Colonel Henry Pleasants and approved by Burnside, whose Ninth Corps, in the assaults of June 17th and 18th, had pushed their advance position to within 130 yards of the Confederate works. Pleasants had been a y, the right one, the men could hear the Confederates working in the fortification above them, trying to locate the mine, of which they had got wind. It was General Burnside's plan that General Edward Ferrero's division of colored troops should head the charge when the mine should be sprung. The black men were kept constantly onyonets about it. The third and final charge was made, about two in the afternoon, and the bloody fight at the crater was ended as the brigade commanders followed Burnside's order to withdraw to the Federal lines. Both of Ledlie's brigade commanders were captured in the crater. The total Federal loss in this disastrous affair was
, La. Union, 56th Ohio, gunboats Signal, Covington, and transport Warner. Confed., Gen. Richard Taylor's command on shore. Losses: Union, 35 killed, 65 wounded, 150 missing; Con fed. No record found. May 5-7, 1864: Wilderness, Va. Union, Forces commanded by Gen. U. S. Grant; Army of the Potomac, Maj.-Gen. George G. Meade; Second Corps, Maj.-Gen. Hancock; Fifth Corps, Maj.-Gen. Warren; Sixth Corps, Maj.-Gen. Sedgwick; Cavalry Corps, Maj.-Gen. Sheridan; and Ninth Corps, Maj.-Gen. Burnside. Confed., Army of Northern Virginia, Gen. R. E. Lee; First Corps, Lieut.-Gen. Longstreet; Second Corps, Lieut.-Gen. Ewell; Third Corps, Lieut.-Gen. A. P. Hill; Cavalry Corps, Maj.-Gen. Stuart. Losses: Union, 2246 killed, 12,137 wounded, 3383 missing; Confed. (estimate) 2000 killed, 6000 wounded, 3400 missing; Union, Brig.-Gens. Wadsworth and Hays killed; Confed. Gens. Jones and Jenkins killed, and Stafford, Longstreet, and Pegram wounded. May 5-9, 1864: Rocky face