Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Jubal Early or search for Jubal Early in all documents.

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almost exhausted, especially that for artillery, the army had to move over the mountains toward the Kanawha valley, thus leaving the Shenandoah valley open for General Early to pass through in making raids on the North; while the right wing of the Union army pushed its way on through northern Georgia to the Chattahoochee River, whi as General Lee did not miss such an opportunity. A portion of the Confederates within the strong entrenchments of Petersburg and Richmond were detached under General Early, who marched down the Shenandoah, crossed the Potomac, and entered Maryland, penetrating as far as Washington, for the defense of which city two corps were detached from the right wing. They succeeded in saving the national capital and in driving Early's forces to the north and west, and took up the line of the Monocacy. Sheridan was given the command of the Federal defense. He soon placed himself in the valley of the Shenandoah, where his army now became the center of the Union line.
ortheast, the corps commanded by Anderson on the left, Ewell in the center, and Early on the right, the latter temporarily replacing A. P. Hill, who was ill. The Feduthern lines. The Second Corps started to recross the Po. Before all were over Early made Bloody angle. McCool's house, within the Bloody angle. The phot12th was not done at the Bloody angle. Burnside on the left of Hancock engaged Early's Bethel church-waiting for orders The couriers lounging around the churcthe base of supplies. On the Southern side Ewell's corps, now commanded by General Early, faced Burnside's and Warren's. Longstreet's corps, still under Anderson, wright, confronted Hancock. There was sharp fighting during the entire day, but Early did not succeed in getting upon the Federal right flank, as he attempted to do. right. Generals Potter and Willcox of the Ninth Corps made a quick capture of Early's advanced rifle-pits and were waiting for the order to advance on his main ent
nter of the Federal line. The Confederate lines were facing north, northwest, and northeast, the corps commanded by Anderson on the left, Ewell in the center, and Early on the right, the latter temporarily replacing A. P. Hill, who was ill. The Federals confronting them were Burnside on the left, Sedgwick and Warren in the center,cted him to send two of his divisions to assist Warren in making an attack on the Southern lines. The Second Corps started to recross the Po. Before all were over Early made Bloody angle. McCool's house, within the Bloody angle. The photographs were taken in 1864, shortly after the struggle of Spotsylvania Court House, ing their opponents where they had stood in the morning. All the fighting on the 12th was not done at the Bloody angle. Burnside on the left of Hancock engaged Early's Bethel church-waiting for orders The couriers lounging around the church door will soon be galloping away with orders; for it is the 23d of May, and, the a
e themselves to the well-directed volley which thinned their ranks. which was now the base of supplies. On the Southern side Ewell's corps, now commanded by General Early, faced Burnside's and Warren's. Longstreet's corps, still under Anderson, was opposite Wright and Smith, while A. P. Hill, on the extreme right, confronted Hancock. There was sharp fighting during the entire day, but Early did not succeed in getting upon the Federal right flank, as he attempted to do. Both armies lay very close to each other and were well entrenched. Lee was naturally strong on his right, and his left was difficult of access, since it must be approached through wood be said as to fortunes of Burnside's and Warren's forces, which were on the Federal right. Generals Potter and Willcox of the Ninth Corps made a quick capture of Early's advanced rifle-pits and were waiting for the order to advance on his main entrenchments, when the order of suspension arrived. Early fell upon him later in the
ies and counter-sallies were continual occurrences after dark. In stealthy sorties one side or the other frequently captured the opposing pickets before alarm could be given. No night was without its special hazard. During the day the pastime here was sharp-shooting with muskets and rifled cannon. Approaching the post of danger — Petersburg, 1865 A few steps nearer the picket line In behind the shelter Grant determined to bring Sheridan from the Shenandoah, whence the bulk of Early's forces had been withdrawn, and send him to assist Sherman. Sheridan left Winchester February 27th, wreaking much destruction as he advanced, but circumstances compelled him to seek a new base at White House. On March 27th he formed a junction with the armies of the Potomac and the James. Such were the happenings that prompted Lee to prepare for the evacuation of Petersburg. And he might be able, in his rapid marches, to outdistance Grant, join his forces with those of Johnston, fall on
ies and counter-sallies were continual occurrences after dark. In stealthy sorties one side or the other frequently captured the opposing pickets before alarm could be given. No night was without its special hazard. During the day the pastime here was sharp-shooting with muskets and rifled cannon. Approaching the post of danger — Petersburg, 1865 A few steps nearer the picket line In behind the shelter Grant determined to bring Sheridan from the Shenandoah, whence the bulk of Early's forces had been withdrawn, and send him to assist Sherman. Sheridan left Winchester February 27th, wreaking much destruction as he advanced, but circumstances compelled him to seek a new base at White House. On March 27th he formed a junction with the armies of the Potomac and the James. Such were the happenings that prompted Lee to prepare for the evacuation of Petersburg. And he might be able, in his rapid marches, to outdistance Grant, join his forces with those of Johnston, fall on
Cav., Army of West Virginia; Confed., Gen. Jubal Early's command. Losses: Union, 100 killeen. Sigel's Reserve Division; Confed., Gen. Jubal Early's command. Losses: Union, 20 killedrook and portion of Sixth Corps; Confed., Gen. Early's command. Losses: Union, 30 killed, 1nion, Averell's Cav.; Confed., Cavalry of Gen. Early's command. Losses: Union, 38 killed, 1 Sixth Corps and Torbert's Cav.; Confed., Gen. Early's command. Losses: Union, 10 killed, 9d, Va. Union, Torbert's Cav.; Confed., Gen. Early's command. Losses: Union, 2 killed, 18v., Maj.-Gen. Phil. Sheridan; Confed., Gen. Jubal Early's command. Losses: Union, 749 killeCuster's, and Torbert's Cav.; Confed., Gen. Jubal Early's army. Losses: Union, 644 killed, 's and Custer's Cav.; Confed., Cavalry of Gen. Early's army. Losses: Union, 43 killed and wdivisions of Sheridan's Cav.; Confed., Gen. Jubal Early's command. Losses: Union, 35 killed[14 more...]