Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Jackson or search for Jackson in all documents.

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gstreet that his advancing force would win the coveted victory. Falling upon Hancock's flank, the fresh troops seemed about to crush the Second Corps, as Jackson's men had crushed the Eleventh the previous year at Chancellorsville. But now, as Jackson, at the critical moment, had fallen by the fire of his own men, so Longstreet and his staff, galloping along the Plank Road, were mistaken by their own soldiers for Federals and fired upon. A minie-ball struck Longstreet in the shoulder, and heown — the former seriously wounded, and the latter killed outright. As at Chancellorsville a year before and on the same battleground, a great captain of the Confederacy was shot down by his own men, and by accident, at the crisis of a battle. Jackson lingered several days after Chancellorsville, while Longstreet recovered and lived to fight for the Confederacy till the surrender at Appomattox. General Wadsworth, of Hancock's corps, was mortally wounded during the day, while making a daring
ws the blackened walls of the leading Virginia military institution after General Hunter's raid through the valley in the early summer of 1864. The V. M. I. meant much to the people of Virginia. It was in this well-known school that Stonewall Jackson had served for ten years as a professor before the outbreak of the war. The cadets of the V. M. I. had fought like veterans in a body under Breckinridge in the battle with Sigel at New Market. Possibly it was because of the school's contributim, was forty-eight years of age when he made the brilliant Valley Campaign of the summer of 1864, which was halted only by the superior forces of Sheridan. A West Point graduate and a veteran of the Mexican War, Early became, after the death of Jackson, one of Lee's most efficient subordinates. He was alert, aggressive, resourceful. His very eccentricities, perhaps, made him all the more successful as a commander of troops in the field. Old Jube's caustic wit and austere ways made him a ter
ws the blackened walls of the leading Virginia military institution after General Hunter's raid through the valley in the early summer of 1864. The V. M. I. meant much to the people of Virginia. It was in this well-known school that Stonewall Jackson had served for ten years as a professor before the outbreak of the war. The cadets of the V. M. I. had fought like veterans in a body under Breckinridge in the battle with Sigel at New Market. Possibly it was because of the school's contributim, was forty-eight years of age when he made the brilliant Valley Campaign of the summer of 1864, which was halted only by the superior forces of Sheridan. A West Point graduate and a veteran of the Mexican War, Early became, after the death of Jackson, one of Lee's most efficient subordinates. He was alert, aggressive, resourceful. His very eccentricities, perhaps, made him all the more successful as a commander of troops in the field. Old Jube's caustic wit and austere ways made him a ter