Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Joseph Eggleston Johnston or search for Joseph Eggleston Johnston in all documents.

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ard a common center. . . . You, I propose to move against Johnston's army, to break it up, and to get into the interior of tad been concentrated into the armies commanded by Lee and Johnston; that commanded by Lee facing the Army of the Potomac and guarding Richmond, while that of Johnston was at Dalton, in the northern part of Georgia, facing Sherman and defending AtlaMississippi River. Richmond and the armies under Lee and Johnston were the main objectives of the campaign. General Granl the armies. The main movements being against Lee and Johnston, all other troops were directed to cooperate with the maipters which follow. From now on the tactics of Lee and Johnston were defensive, and they awaited the assaults of the Unios losing so much ground by its defensive policy, relieved Johnston, an officer of great ability, who was commanding at Atlan the Army of the Potomac and Sheridan's troopers, to join Johnston, and so possibly to overpower Sherman's army. Sheridan s
of March he received his commission. He now planned the final great double movement of the war. Taking control of the whole campaign against Lee, but leaving the Army of the Potomac under Meade's direct command, he chose the strongest of his corps commanders, W. T. Sherman, for the head of affairs in the West. Grant's immediate objects were to defeat Lee's army and to capture Richmond, the latter to be accomplished by General Butler and the Army of the James; Sherman's object was to crush Johnston, to seize that important railroad center, Atlanta, Georgia, and, with Banks' assistance, to open a way between the Atlantic coast and Mobile, on the Gulf, thus dividing the Confederacy north and south, as the conquest of the Mississippi had parted it east and west. It was believed that if either or both of these campaigns were successful, the downfall of the Confederacy would be assured. Belle plain, where the wagon-trains started In Grant's advance through the desolate tract guarde
e the Confederate earthworks such as General Joseph E. Johnston had caused to be thrown up by the Nestrous to the Confederates. General Joseph Eggleston Johnston, C. S. A.: born 1809; West Pointiles or more above the Confederate position. Johnston crossed the next day. Thomas followed later. ch he describes as one vast fort, saying that Johnston must have at least fifty miles of connected tat Sherman might drive him back upon Atlanta, Johnston had constructed, during the winter, heavily fservice to the Union cause. He dismissed General Johnston and put another in his place, one who wasve. Jefferson Davis did not agree with General Johnston's military judgment, and he seized on the fact that Johnston had so steadily retreated before the Northern army as an excuse for his removal.s believed that he would change the policy of Johnston to one of open battle with Sherman's army. And so it proved. Johnston had lost, since the opening of the campaign at Dalton, about fifteen th[3 more...]
d against Sherman's army was that of General Joseph E. Johnston, which had spent the winter at Daltoe the Confederate earthworks such as General Joseph E. Johnston had caused to be thrown up by the Neiles or more above the Confederate position. Johnston crossed the next day. Thomas followed later. service to the Union cause. He dismissed General Johnston and put another in his place, one who wasve. Jefferson Davis did not agree with General Johnston's military judgment, and he seized on the fact that Johnston had so steadily retreated before the Northern army as an excuse for his removal.s believed that he would change the policy of Johnston to one of open battle with Sherman's army. And so it proved. Johnston had lost, since the opening of the campaign at Dalton, about fifteen thuch greater. This battle had been planned by Johnston before his removal, but he had been waiting f what he set out to do, rested his army. Had Johnston's skill been opposed to him till the end, the[3 more...]
ed all the inhabitants to be removed. General Hood pronounced the act one of ingenious cruelty, transcending any that had ever before come to his notice in the dark history of the war. Sherman insisted that his act was one of kindness, and that Johnston and Hood themselves had done the same — removed families from their homes — in other places. The decision was fully carried out. The Atlanta bank before the march to the sea As this photograph was taken, the wagons stood in the street of ocket the cipher message just received telling of the assassination of Lincoln. Color-guard of the eighth Minnesota--with Sherman when Johnston surrendered The end of the march — Bennett's farmhouse henceforth this was changed. General Joseph E. Johnston, his old foe of Resaca and Kenesaw Mountain, had been recalled and was now in command of the troops in the Carolinas. No longer would the streams and the swamps furnish the only resistance to the progress of the Union army. The firs<
ed all the inhabitants to be removed. General Hood pronounced the act one of ingenious cruelty, transcending any that had ever before come to his notice in the dark history of the war. Sherman insisted that his act was one of kindness, and that Johnston and Hood themselves had done the same — removed families from their homes — in other places. The decision was fully carried out. The Atlanta bank before the march to the sea As this photograph was taken, the wagons stood in the street of ocket the cipher message just received telling of the assassination of Lincoln. Color-guard of the eighth Minnesota--with Sherman when Johnston surrendered The end of the march — Bennett's farmhouse henceforth this was changed. General Joseph E. Johnston, his old foe of Resaca and Kenesaw Mountain, had been recalled and was now in command of the troops in the Carolinas. No longer would the streams and the swamps furnish the only resistance to the progress of the Union army. The firs<
s that prompted Lee to prepare for the evacuation of Petersburg. And he might be able, in his rapid marches, to outdistance Grant, join his forces with those of Johnston, fall on Sherman, destroy one wing of the Union army and arouse the hopes of his soldiers, and prolong the life of his Government. General Grant knew the condch 25, 1865. Lee was confronted by the dilemma of either being starved out of Petersburg and Richmond, or of getting out himself and uniting his army to that of Johnston in North Carolina, to crush Sherman before Grant could reach him. Gordon was to begin this latter, almost impossible, task by an attack on Fort Stedman, which ththey had suffered from hunger. Now the only avenue of supply that had remained in their control was seized by the Union armies. The possibility of joining with Johnston's forces, or of making a last stand where the pursuer should put himself at a disadvantage, was the hope which sustained the famished heroes in gray as they left
ed a junction with the armies of the Potomac and the James. Such were the happenings that prompted Lee to prepare for the evacuation of Petersburg. And he might be able, in his rapid marches, to outdistance Grant, join his forces with those of Johnston, fall on Sherman, destroy one wing of the Union army and arouse the hopes of his soldiers, and prolong the life of his Government. General Grant knew the condition of Lee's army and, with the unerring instinct of a military leader, surmised wtrusted the last desperate effort to break through the tightening Federal lines, March 25, 1865. Lee was confronted by the dilemma of either being starved out of Petersburg and Richmond, or of getting out himself and uniting his army to that of Johnston in North Carolina, to crush Sherman before Grant could reach him. Gordon was to begin this latter, almost impossible, task by an attack on Fort Stedman, which the Confederates believed to be the weakest point in the Federal fortifications. The
Appomattox by the pontoon, Pocahontas and railroad bridges. These were given to the flames immediately after crossing, in order to hinder the pursuit. Though there were in the fields of Mississippi and Alabama supplies enough to feed Lee's army for a whole year, the means of transportation was so poor that all through the winter they had suffered from hunger. Now the only avenue of supply that had remained in their control was seized by the Union armies. The possibility of joining with Johnston's forces, or of making a last stand where the pursuer should put himself at a disadvantage, was the hope which sustained the famished heroes in gray as they left behind them the burning bridge. The capital of the Confederacy fallen: the desert and the waste places in Richmond, April, 1865. The ruins of the armory in the foreground, the pillars of the Petersburg and Richmond Railroad bridge across the James, a few houses in Manchester beyond the stream — this picture of desolation re
av., 7th Ohio Battery; Confed., Troops of Gen. Jos. E. Johnston's command. Losses: Union, 5 killed, 20man's Cavalry; Confed., Army of Tennessee, Gen. J. E. Johnston, commanding; Hardee's Corps, Hood's Corps, When. Schofield; Confed., Army of Tennessee, Gen. J. E. Johnston, commanding; Army of Mississippi, Lieut.-Gen.-Gen. Sherman; Confed., Army of Tennessee, Gen. J. E. Johnston, commanding. Losses: Union, 2400 killedW. T. Sherman; Confed., Army of Tennessee--Gen. J. E. Johnston, commanding. Losses: Union, 1370 killedissippi, Maj.-Gen. W. T. Sherman; Confed., Gen. J. E. Johnston's command. Losses: Union, 80 killed, 45ery E 1st Mich. Artil.; Confed., Troops of Gen. J. E. Johnston's command. Losses: Union, 8 killed, 30 eth Corps, and Kilpatrick's Cav.; Confed., Gen. J. E. Johnston's army and Wade Hampton's Cav. Losses: recorded, 1200 captured. April 26, 1865: Gen. Jos. E. Johnston surrendered the Army of Tennessee and other