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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 895 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 706 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 615 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 536 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 465 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 417 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 414 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 393 5 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 376 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 369 33 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Fitzhugh Lee or search for Fitzhugh Lee in all documents.

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me the beloved leader of the Southern host, General Lee. He was astride his favorite battle-horse, measure of arms with his great antagonist, General Lee. The latter returned to his entrenchments It is the belief of some military writers that Lee deliberately chose the Wilderness as a battle-gApprised of the movement of the Federal trains, Lee, with his usual sagacious foresight, surmised tederates held them until reenforcements sent by Lee from Hill and Anderson drove them back. On thee in the campaign the cry arose from the ranks, Lee to the rear! The beloved commander was led bac Taylor's Bridge could easily have been held by Lee for a much longer time, but its ready abandonme the march from the Wilderness to Spotsylvania, Lee's troops took the shorter route, along main roah from Hancock and Warren to attack the apex of Lee's wedge on the south bank of the river, but thedecide Grant's last chance to interpose between Lee and Richmond. Hancock and the Second Corps arr[87 more...]
a flank move, to get between Lee and Richmond. Lee foresaw Grant's purpose and also moved his cavanion cavalry under Merritt in conflict with Fitzhugh Lee's division of Stuart's cavalry. Warren senme of their divisions to reenforce Hancock, and Lee sent all the assistance possible to the troops tive that he hold the gain made by his troops. Lee could ill afford the loss resistance would entas in high officers was very The redoubt that Lee let go This redoubt covered Taylor's Bridge,of the Federals here was but another example of Lee's favorite rule to let his antagonist attack hithe possession of it meant that they had driven Lee to his last corner. severe, the killed includition to the loss of these important commanders, Lee was further crippled in efficient commanders byved, Grant's army would ultimately make that of Lee's succumb, from sheer exhaustion and disintegrah Anna, Grant had been completely checkmated by Lee. He realized this and decided on a new move, al[41 more...]
Porter later wrote: Whether to attempt to crush Lee's army on the north side of the James, with thee House Landing, on the Pamunkey River. Both Lee and Meade had received reenforcements — the Ready for the advance that Lee drove back Between these luxuriant banks stretch the pontoons andwould require two crossings of the river, while Lee could quickly march troops from one side to thehe James was in a position to reach out to him. Lee had again confronted him, entrenching himself b of the Potomac against the inferior numbers of Lee, and in a brave assault upon the Confederate en Army of the Potomac out of its position before Lee, who confronted it at Cold Harbor. Lee had thehteenth Corps was placed along the Matadequin. Lee threatened attack on the 6th and 7th, but he sofor the army that is again endeavoring to drive Lee across the Chickahominy and back upon Richmond. comparatively small losses they had sustained, Lee's army stood on the field of this last engageme[17 more...]
So Butler was to eliminate Beauregard while Grant struck at Lee. With forty thousand men, he was ordered to land at Bermuda Richmond by way of Petersburg, while Grant meanwhile engaged Lee farther north. Arriving at Broadway Landing, seen in the lo Union position at Gettysburg. But for the same reason that Lee attacked Little Round Top, Sherman, on June 27, 1864, ordere the military men of both sides, was reckoned second only to Lee, if second, in the qualities which fit an officer for the re personal charge of the Army of the Potomac and move against Lee, while to Sherman, whom, at Grant's request, President LincoSherman was apprised of the time when Grant was to move upon Lee on the banks of the Rapidan, in Virginia, and he prepared tospapers quoted the Federal General Scott's remark, Beware of Lee advancing, and watch Johnston at a stand; for the devil himse same as that which was winning fame against heavy odds for Lee in Virginia. The countenance of Hood, on the other hand,
icer, served in Butler's campaign, compares Grant's maneuvers of 1864 to Napoleon's of 1815. While Napoleon advanced upon Wellington it was essential that Grouchy should detain Blucher. So Butler was to eliminate Beauregard while Grant struck at Lee. With forty thousand men, he was ordered to land at Bermuda Hundred, seize and hold City Point as a future army base, and advance upon Richmond by way of Petersburg, while Grant meanwhile engaged Lee farther north. Arriving at Broadway Landing, sLee farther north. Arriving at Broadway Landing, seen in the lower picture, Butler put his army over the Appomattox on pontoons, occupied City Point, May 4th, and advanced within three miles of Petersburg, May 9th. The city might have been easily taken by a vigorous move, but Butler delayed until Beauregard arrived with a hastily gathered army and decisively defeated the Federals at Drewry's Bluff, May 10th. Like Grouchy, Butler failed. Port Darling The masked battery Where Butler's troops crossed — Broadway landing on the Appomatto
tification, than the Union position at Gettysburg. But for the same reason that Lee attacked Little Round Top, Sherman, on June 27, 1864, ordered an assault on the he common consent of the military men of both sides, was reckoned second only to Lee, if second, in the qualities which fit an officer for the responsibility of grea armies, was to take personal charge of the Army of the Potomac and move against Lee, while to Sherman, whom, at Grant's request, President Lincoln had placed at the telegraph, General Sherman was apprised of the time when Grant was to move upon Lee on the banks of the Rapidan, in Virginia, and he prepared to move his own army a of the Southern newspapers quoted the Federal General Scott's remark, Beware of Lee advancing, and watch Johnston at a stand; for the devil himself would be defeategia was precisely the same as that which was winning fame against heavy odds for Lee in Virginia. The countenance of Hood, on the other hand, indicates an eager,
idan returned from his raid on the Virginia Central Railroad. He had encountered Hampton and Fitzhugh Lee at Trevilian Station on June 11th, and turned back after doing great damage to the Railroad. to be applied and for the gigantic upheaval, sure to follow. Grant, in order to get a part of Lee's army away, had sent Hancock's Corps and two divisions of cavalry north of the James, as if he mntrenched on the Railroad. the fight was renewed on the next day, when, strongly reenforced by Lee, the Confederates burst suddenly upon the Federals. Mahone thrust his gallant division through tyes, and but for the arrival of the Ninth Corps, the field would have been lost. Two days later, Lee again attacked the position by massing The defenders' counter-mine the sinister burrow openbrave division, shattered and broken, drifted back to their own line. It was the forlorn hope of Lee's beleaguered army. Fort McGilvery was less than one-half a mile from the Appomattox River, just
idan returned from his raid on the Virginia Central Railroad. He had encountered Hampton and Fitzhugh Lee at Trevilian Station on June 11th, and turned back after doing great damage to the Railroad. to be applied and for the gigantic upheaval, sure to follow. Grant, in order to get a part of Lee's army away, had sent Hancock's Corps and two divisions of cavalry north of the James, as if he mntrenched on the Railroad. the fight was renewed on the next day, when, strongly reenforced by Lee, the Confederates burst suddenly upon the Federals. Mahone thrust his gallant division through tyes, and but for the arrival of the Ninth Corps, the field would have been lost. Two days later, Lee again attacked the position by massing The defenders' counter-mine the sinister burrow openbrave division, shattered and broken, drifted back to their own line. It was the forlorn hope of Lee's beleaguered army. Fort McGilvery was less than one-half a mile from the Appomattox River, just
to open their houses to the sick and wounded of Lee's army. As Grant's troops marched in, many palr after suitable mining operations had weakened Lee's defenses and prepared for such an operation. ernment. General Grant knew the condition of Lee's army and, with the unerring instinct of a milrson Davis received the ominous tidings sent by Lee to the capital of the Confederacy that both Petdays at Hatcher's Run, and again at Five Forks, Lee had attempted to break through the besiegers, bederate lines and wheeled to attack Fort Gregg, Lee called his staff about him, telling them to witnumbers at once. This is a sad business! were Lee's words as he turned to his staff. Couriers weell as in the hearts of the grizzled veterans. Lee had inspired them, but in addition to this insp march of the Army of Northern Virginia. General Lee and his officers held a council of war on tand specifying the terms of surrender, to which Lee replied promptly, rejecting those terms, which [59 more...]
hirty-odd miles of Federal trenches that hem in Lee's ragged army. Outdoor life and constant rough James. Such were the happenings that prompted Lee to prepare for the evacuation of Petersburg. Aangled woods and low swamps in the direction of Lee's right. At the same time, Lee stripped his enLee stripped his entrenchments at Petersburg as much as he dared and hurried General Anderson, with infantry, and FitzFitzhugh Lee, with cavalry, forward to hold the roads over which he hoped to escape. On Friday morning, officer, just turned thirty-three at the time, Lee entrusted the last desperate effort to break thnst them. In an interview with General Gordon, Lee laid before him his reports, which showed how cnumbers at once. This is a sad business! were Lee's words as he turned to his staff. Couriers weee soldiers who bore out Lee's prophecy When Lee, looking toward Fort Gregg as the Federals attaith night came the news of the crushing blow to Lee. General Grant was seated by his camp-fire surr[24 more...]
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