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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for John Sedgwick or search for John Sedgwick in all documents.

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ld line of Bull Run. On the 7th of November, Sedgwick made a brilliant capture of the redoubts on t General Grant established his headquarters. Sedgwick's corps The grand campaign under way — the, on the Rapidan. Here the Sixth Corps under Sedgwick and Warren's Fifth Corps began crossing on thossible, beyond Parker's store. Warren and Sedgwick began to entrench themselves when they realizrders, through Meade, for a general attack by Sedgwick, Warren, and Hancock along the entire line, as before five the Confederates opened fire on Sedgwick's right, and soon the battle was raging along A couple of months later, on the 9th of May, Sedgwick again was jesting — before Spotsylvania Courton tense. A sharpshooter's bullet whistled — Sedgwick fell. He was taken to Meade's headquarters. ooting. While placing some field-pieces, General Sedgwick was hit by a sharpshooter's bullet and inoss in high officers was light, excepting General Sedgwick on the 9th. General Webb was wounded, and[17 more...
behind Hancock's position and was followed by Sedgwick, who marched by way of Chancellorsville. Burfewer men than their opponents. Meade and Sedgwick — before the advance that brought Sedgwick's Sedgwick's death at Spotsylvania To the right of General Meade, his chief and friend, stands Major-General JMajor-General John Sedgwick, commanding the Sixth Army Corps. He wears his familiar round hat and is smiling. He A couple of months later, on the 9th of May, Sedgwick again was jesting — before Spotsylvania Courtery exposed to the Confederate fire, to which Sedgwick had playfully replied, McMahon, I would like on tense. A sharpshooter's bullet whistled — Sedgwick fell. He was taken to Meade's headquarters. s confronting them were Burnside on the left, Sedgwick and Warren in the center, and Hancock on the ooting. While placing some field-pieces, General Sedgwick was hit by a sharpshooter's bullet and inoss in high officers was light, excepting General Sedgwick on the 9th. General Webb was wounded, and<
commanded by Gen. U. S. Grant; Army of the Potomac, Maj.-Gen. George G. Meade; Second Corps, Maj.-Gen. Hancock; Fifth Corps, Maj.-Gen. Warren; Sixth Corps, Maj.-Gen. Sedgwick; Cavalry Corps, Maj.-Gen. Sheridan; and Ninth Corps, Maj.-Gen. Burnside. Confed., Army of Northern Virginia, Gen. R. E. Lee; First Corps, Lieut.-Gen. Lonern Virginia, Gen. R. E. Lee. Losses: Union, 2725 killed, 13,416 wounded, 2258 missing; Confed., 1000 killed, 5000 wounded, 3000 missing; Union, Maj.-Gen. Sedgwick and Brig.-Gens. Rice and Stevenson killed; Confed. Gens. Daniel and Perrin killed; Maj.-Gen. Ed. Johnson and Brig.-Gen. Steuart captured. May 9, 1864:held on until driven back by a brilliant charge of Griffin's men. Cheering the victors of Petersburg, April 3d Here, on the gabioned parapet of Fort Hell (Sedgwick), the garrison left behind, with shouts and waving of hats and firing of muskets, are signalling their enthusiasm at the success of their comrades, who now hold