Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) or search for Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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thence along the Memphis and Charleston Railroad to the Mississippi, which was also in Union hands. All south of that line was in the hands of the Confederates, except a few stations along the sea coast, the possession of which assisted in the blockade. Most of the opposing troops which were east of the Mississippi had been concentrated into the armies commanded by Lee and Johnston; that commanded by Lee facing the Army of the Potomac and guarding Richmond, while that of Johnston was at Dalton, in the northern part of Georgia, facing Sherman and defending Atlanta, a great railroad center and a point of concentration of supplies for the Confederate troops, wherever they were stationed, east of the Mississippi River. Richmond and the armies under Lee and Johnston were the main objectives of the campaign. General Grant, as commander of the Union armies, placed himself with the Army of the Potomac, where the greatest opposition was to be expected, and where he considered his perso
s opponent wielded, and made his campaign from Dalton to the Chattahoochee a model of defensive warfement upon the Confederates strongly posted at Dalton. Sherman's cavalry forces under Stoneman and February, sent by Grant to engage Johnston at Dalton during Sherman's Meridian campaign. Johnson weph E. Johnston, which had spent the winter at Dalton, in the State of Georgia, some thirty miles som the vicinity of Chattanooga, he retreated to Dalton and stopped for a night's rest. Discovering trn range of the Cumberland Mountains, north of Dalton, on which a large part of Johnston's army was General O. O. Howard's Fourth Corps to occupy Dalton when evacuated. When Johnston discovered thisston from Kenesaw as he had flanked him out of Dalton and Allatoona Pass. He thereupon turned upon , heavily fortified positions all the way from Dalton. During his two months in retreat the fortifihad lost, since the opening of the campaign at Dalton, about fifteen thousand men, and the army that[4 more...]
s opponent wielded, and made his campaign from Dalton to the Chattahoochee a model of defensive warf February, sent by Grant to engage Johnston at Dalton during Sherman's Meridian campaign. Johnson weph E. Johnston, which had spent the winter at Dalton, in the State of Georgia, some thirty miles som the vicinity of Chattanooga, he retreated to Dalton and stopped for a night's rest. Discovering tar Resaca, which is about eighteen miles below Dalton. Sherman, with the main part of the army, srn range of the Cumberland Mountains, north of Dalton, on which a large part of Johnston's army was the Confederate stronghold. Meanwhile, on the Dalton road there was a sharp cavalry fight, the Fede General O. O. Howard's Fourth Corps to occupy Dalton when evacuated. When Johnston discovered thisston from Kenesaw as he had flanked him out of Dalton and Allatoona Pass. He thereupon turned upon had lost, since the opening of the campaign at Dalton, about fifteen thousand men, and the army that[4 more...]
on Kenesaw Mountain, eighteen miles away, from which he could see the cloud of smoke and hear the faint reverberation of the cannons' boom. When he learned by signal that Corse was there and in command, he said, If Corse is there, he will hold out; I know the man. And he did hold out, and saved the stores at Allatoona, at a loss of seven hundred of his men, he himself being among the wounded, while French lost more than a thousand. General Hood continued to move northward to Resaca and Dalton, passing over the same ground on which the two great armies had fought during the spring and summer. He destroyed the railroads, burned the ties, and twisted the rails, leaving greater havoc, if possible, in a country that was already a wilderness of desolation. For some weeks Sherman followed Hood in the hope that a general engagement would result. But Hood had no intention to fight. He went on to the banks of the Tennessee opposite Florence, Alabama. His army was lightly equipped, and
on Kenesaw Mountain, eighteen miles away, from which he could see the cloud of smoke and hear the faint reverberation of the cannons' boom. When he learned by signal that Corse was there and in command, he said, If Corse is there, he will hold out; I know the man. And he did hold out, and saved the stores at Allatoona, at a loss of seven hundred of his men, he himself being among the wounded, while French lost more than a thousand. General Hood continued to move northward to Resaca and Dalton, passing over the same ground on which the two great armies had fought during the spring and summer. He destroyed the railroads, burned the ties, and twisted the rails, leaving greater havoc, if possible, in a country that was already a wilderness of desolation. For some weeks Sherman followed Hood in the hope that a general engagement would result. But Hood had no intention to fight. He went on to the banks of the Tennessee opposite Florence, Alabama. His army was lightly equipped, and
sing; Confed. No record found. October 9, 1864: Tom's Brook, Fisher's Hill or Strasburg, Va. Union, Merritt's, Custer's and Torbert's Cav.; Confed., Rosser's and Lomax's Cav. Losses: Union, 9 killed, 67 wounded; Confed., 100 killed and wounded, 180 missing. October 13, 1864: reconnaissance to Strasburg, Va. Union, Maj.-Gens. Emory's and Crook's troops; Confed., Gen. Early's command. Losses: Union, 30 killed, 144 wounded, 40 missing. October 13, 1864: Dalton, Ga. Union, troops under Col. Johnson, 44th U. S. Colored; Confed. Fort Sumter in 1865. The calm sunlight of April, 1865, is falling on the northern face of the Fort which had withstood a severer bombardment than any other fortification attacked during the Civil War. This wall was across the Fort from the one upon which the heavy Union batteries on Morris Island concentrated their fire. But many a shot passing over the southern wall struck this rampart from the inside, making