Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Kingston, Ga. (Georgia, United States) or search for Kingston, Ga. (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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rike Hancock alone, or at most Hancock and Warren. But Lee, fearing perhaps to risk a general contest, remained strictly on the defensive, moving his troops out along the Telegraph Road to make sure of keeping between his adversary and Richmond. Meanwhile, Burnside, followed by Wright, marched on the evening of the 21st, and next day came up with Grant's headquarters at Guiney's Station. Here he found Grant sitting on the porch, reading the despatch that told of Sherman's capture of Kingston, Georgia, and his crossing of the Etowah River. Burnside was ordered forward to Bethel Church and thence to Ox Ford, on the North Anna, there on the 24th to be held in check by Lee's faultless formation. troops and was defeated, while on the other side of the salient Wright succeeded in driving Anderson back. The question has naturally arisen why that salient was regarded of such vital importance as to induce the two chief commanders to force their armies into such a hand-to-hand contest
rike Hancock alone, or at most Hancock and Warren. But Lee, fearing perhaps to risk a general contest, remained strictly on the defensive, moving his troops out along the Telegraph Road to make sure of keeping between his adversary and Richmond. Meanwhile, Burnside, followed by Wright, marched on the evening of the 21st, and next day came up with Grant's headquarters at Guiney's Station. Here he found Grant sitting on the porch, reading the despatch that told of Sherman's capture of Kingston, Georgia, and his crossing of the Etowah River. Burnside was ordered forward to Bethel Church and thence to Ox Ford, on the North Anna, there on the 24th to be held in check by Lee's faultless formation. troops and was defeated, while on the other side of the salient Wright succeeded in driving Anderson back. The question has naturally arisen why that salient was regarded of such vital importance as to induce the two chief commanders to force their armies into such a hand-to-hand contest
ton manoevers. The strong works in the pictures, commanding the railroad bridge over the Etowah River, were the fourth fortified position to be abandoned by Johnston within a month. Pursued by Thomas from Resaca, he had made a brief stand at Kingston and then fallen back steadily and in superb order into Cassville. There he issued an address to his army announcing his purpose to retreat no more but to accept battle. His troops were all drawn up in preparation for a struggle, but that nighthey moved southward; but the Federal engineers, following the army, repaired the line and rebuilt the bridges almost as fast as the army could march. Sherman's movement toward Dallas drew Johnston from the slopes of the Allatoona Hills. From Kingston, the Federal leader wrote on May 23d, I am already within fifty miles of Atlanta. But he was not to enter that city for many weeks, not before he had measured swords again and again with his great antagonist. On the 25th of May, the two great
ton manoevers. The strong works in the pictures, commanding the railroad bridge over the Etowah River, were the fourth fortified position to be abandoned by Johnston within a month. Pursued by Thomas from Resaca, he had made a brief stand at Kingston and then fallen back steadily and in superb order into Cassville. There he issued an address to his army announcing his purpose to retreat no more but to accept battle. His troops were all drawn up in preparation for a struggle, but that nighthey moved southward; but the Federal engineers, following the army, repaired the line and rebuilt the bridges almost as fast as the army could march. Sherman's movement toward Dallas drew Johnston from the slopes of the Allatoona Hills. From Kingston, the Federal leader wrote on May 23d, I am already within fifty miles of Atlanta. But he was not to enter that city for many weeks, not before he had measured swords again and again with his great antagonist. On the 25th of May, the two great
rps, Army of the Ohio, Maj.-Gen. Schofield; Confed., Army of Tennessee, Gen. J. E. Johnston, commanding; Army of Mississippi, Lieut.-Gen. Leonidas Polk: Losses: Union, 600 killed, 2147 wounded; Confed., 300 killed, 1500 wounded, 1000 missing. May 15, 1864: New Market, Va. Union, Maj.-Gen. Sigel's command; Confed., Gen. J. C. Breckinridge's command. Losses: Union, 93 killed, 482 wounded, 256 missing; Confed., 42 killed, 522 wounded. May 18, 1864: Rome and Kingston, Ga. Union, Second Division of Fourteenth Corps and Cavalry, Army of the Cumberland. Confed., Gen. Johnston's command. Losses: Union, 16 killed, 59 wounded. May 18, 1864: Bayou de Glaize or Calhoun Station, La. Union, Portions of Sixteenth, Seventeenth Corps, and Cavalry of Nineteenth Corps; Confed., Gen. Taylor's command. Losses: Union, 60 killed, 300 wounded; Confed., 500 killed and wounded. May 19-22, 1864: Cassville, Ga. Union, Twentieth Corps, Maj.-Gen